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Volume 6333

ANNIVERSARIES OF ERB'S LIFE & LEGACY
A COLLATION OF THE DAILY EVENTS IN ERB-WORLD
FROM THE PAGES OF THE HILLMANS' ERBzine
Compiled by John Martin
Web Design with added events, links,
illustrations and photo collages by Bill Hillman

JUNE CONTENTS
WEEK THREE
JUNE 15 ~ JUNE 16 ~ JUNE 17 ~ JUNE 18 ~ JUNE 19 ~ JUNE 20 ~ JUNE 21

VISIT THE JUNE WEEK III PHOTO ALBUM
www.ERBzine.com/mag63/6333pics.html
BACK TO JUNE WEEK 2
www.ERBzine.com/mag63/6332.html

Click for full-size images

JUNE 15

Click or go to links referenced below for more info and larger images
*** Edgar Rice Burroughs believed Johnny Weissmuller made an ideal Tarzan.
ERB also believed the Tarzan in the comic strips was an ideal Tarzan.
And he certainly believed his creation, as portrayed by himself in the original books, was ideal as well.
Here's how ERB stated the major reason for Tarzan's success in whatever medium: "...Tarzan is a character into which every man can slide himself mentally and, by the same token, into whose arms every woman can slide herself. He is the materialization of good health and the body perfect, the body potent and masterful."
ERB's comments appeared in an article, written by ERB, headlined "Weissmuller Ideal Tarzan Says Creator." The article appeared this date, June 15, in 1939 in the Hartford Courant.
Weissmuller Ideal Tarzan Says Creator.
http://www.erbzine.com/mag17/1788.html#ideal
Weissmuller and Friends  Collage I
Weissmuller and Friends  Collage II
Weissmuller and The Mexican Spitfire

*** 1941: Neal Adams - ERB Illustrator for Ballantine PB covers, etc. - was born in New York City.
Tarzan Ballantine Covers by Neal Adams
http://www.erbzine.com/mag36/3610.html
*** "Tarzan and the Moto-Motos," by John Celardo and Bill Elliot, began running June 15, 1959, and ran for 90 days.

Tarzan and the Moto-Motos: All 90 Celardo Strips
http://www.erbzine.com/mag43/4358.html


JUNE 16

Click or go to links referenced below for more info and larger images
*** Martin Powell, who has written "everything from mystery to science fiction, comic books, graphic novels, and children's books," also wrote the script for the Edgar Rice Burroughs's "Jungle Tales of Tarzan" graphic novel published by Sequential Pulp and Dark Horse Comics. Diana Leto was creative director for the colorful volume and also provided the artwork for the opening story, "Tarzan's First Love." The book was offered for sale at amazon starting June 16, 2015, but had been available in comic shops and bookstores a few days before on June 10.
Powell called it, "An important book to me that helped open a lot of doors. I'm very grateful for it."
Powell had also posted about the book's anniversary on his own facebook page on June 11: "Three years ago yesterday, June 10, my JUNGLE TALES OF TARZAN™ graphic novel was published by Dark Horse Comics. A dream come true which has changed my life much for better, and I can hardly express the thrill of being credited on the book's spine with Edgar Rice Burroughs."
He offered special thanks to his wife, Leia, also an author as well as multi-media artist, "for proof-reading my dozen scripts and saving my sanity during a long deadline-induced period of sleep deprivation."
Powell is also a writer for several of the comic strips available with a subscription at www.edgarriceburroughs.com/comics
Jungle Tales of Tarzan: History ~ Art ~ Summary
http://www.erbzine.com/mag4/0492.html
Edgar Rice Burroughs Corporate Site
http://www.edgarriceburroughs.com
Featured at Edgar Rice Burroughs Still Lives
http://www.erbzine.com/mag62/6264.html
Read the Jungle Tales e-Text edition
http://www.erbzine.com/craft/t6jt.html

Off-Site Reference:
Jungle Tales Amazon Purchase



Johnny Weissmuller personally picked Johnny Sheffield from among 300 hopefuls as the young boy he thought would do best as the adopted son of Tarzan. Thus, the five-year-old, who was already landing roles in some movies, became "Boy" in eight Tarzan movies, three with MGM and five more when the franchise moved over to RKO studios.
The movie title was "Tarzan Finds A Son!" and was the only Tarzan movie to have an exclamation point at the end of the title. It was released June 16, 1939.
It's not all that common for a movie to be "awarded" the exclamation point for its title. John Wayne got one for both "McClintock!" and "Hatari!" Hatari means "danger" in swahili and the exclamation point was deserved. It's also been used for movies ranging from "Attack of the Killer Tomatoes!" to "That Darned Cat!"
Tarzan Finds A Son!: Credits ~ Posters ~ Stills ~ Summary
http://www.erbzine.com/mag6/0620.html
Son! Magazine Article from LOOK Magazine
http://www.erbzine.com/mag16/1658.html
Lobby displays
http://www.erbzine.com/mag6/0620a.html
Son! Coop Chocolate cards
http://www.erbzine.com/mag13/1376.html

Off-Site Reference
Son in IMDB


*** "Tarzan Myth and Mystery," a museum exhibit and presentation, opened June 16, 2016, at the Brazos Valley Museum of Natural History in Bryan, Texas, and ran through Oct. 29 of that year.
The exhibit opened at 6 p.m. with a free public lecture by Edgar Rice Burroughs Bibliophile Jim Goodwin. The exhibit showcased items from "an extensive collection of Tarzan and Edgar Rice Burroughs memorabilia. Early publications, beautiful original artwork, rare books, and rarely seen film posters" were shown alongside stunning taxidermy animals from central Africa. Jim, often known as Jimmie, was at the recent ECOF in Folsom, Calif., and afterward toured the northwest U.S., seeing numerous natural and historic sites.
2014 Dum-Dum in Bryan, Texas
http://www.erbzine.com/mag51/5160.html

Off-Site Reference
Bryan Museum Exhibit
Blogger Review


*** 1916: The Return of the Mucker (Out There Somewhere), part 1 of 5 parts appeared in All-Story.
The Mucker and Return of the Mucker
http://www.erbzine.com/mag7/0757.html
*** 1937: Ed created a book of poetry &  illustrations for Caryl - just as he had  done for his niece Evelyn - Li'l B. Her Book
Edgar Rice Burroughs Poetry
http://www.erbzine.com/mag0/0003.html


JUNE 17

Click or go to links referenced below for more info and larger images
*** Edgar Rice Burroughs graduated from being merely an author of pulp stories to an author with a full-fledged book on high quality paper (good enough to last more than a century!), when A.C. McClurg & Co. printed 5,000 copies of "Tarzan of the Apes."
The official "publication date" was June 17, 1914, but the books had actually rolled off the presses a bit earlier. According to his contract, ERB was entitled to a dozen free books and he signed one of them to his wife, Emma Centennia, dating it June 3. Not long after, he also autographed and dated a pre-June 17 copy to his brother.
After McClurg printed the initial 5,000 copies on its own press, it placed an order for 2,500 more from another printing plant, the one which added the highly-sought acorn to the spine. Eventually, 2,500 more were printed for a third state, minus acorn, for a total print run of 10,000 copies of the first edition in three states.
ERB bibliographies and websites give details on how to tell a first state from a third. The second state is immediately identifiable by the acorn.
"Tarzan of the Apes" had appeared for the first time two years earlier in the October 1912 issue of The All-Story. However, the book publication was not the second appearance of the story, or the third, etc. The second and several other appearances of the tale were as newspaper serials, first by The New York Evening World, as Robert B. Zeuschner reports in his "Edgar Rice Burroughs: The Bibliography."The story was serialized in many other newspapers and was so popular with readers that pressure was put on McClurg to publish it in book form, an idea it had rejected when ERB had first proposed it to them. And the rest is history!
Tarzan of the Apes: History ~ Art ~ Docs
http://www.erbzine.com/mag4/0483.html
Read the full e-Text Edition
http://www.erbzine.com/craft/t1ta.html

Off-Site Reference:
Differentiating ERB editions



*** Fathers Day in 1940 came on June 16 and ERB's children sent him a radiogram with best wishes. On the next day, June 17, ERB wrote to them: "Thanks a lot for your Father's Day radiogram. It was very sweet of you to think of me. It was telephoned to me yesterday afternoon shortly after I returned from a week-end fishing trip at Waianae...."
The letter went on to describe the fishing trip, in which ERB said "I was wet and filthy and hot and sick, and I ain't never goin' fishin' no more."
ERB's Fathers Day Letter to Home
http://www.erbzine.com/mag10/1049.html#June%2017
Burroughs Family Stories
http://www.erbzine.com/mag27/2754.html
Burroughs Family History
http://www.erbzine.com/mag11/1178.html


*** Thomas Haden Church was born June 17, 1960, in Yolo, Calif., and became a perfect Thark in "John Carter," loyal to the horde to a fault and ready to take over at the first opportunity, no matter who he had to slay or sick the white apes on. Among his other acting roles, Church menaced Spider-Man as well as John Carter. Church looks as if he is having about as much fun as his character Tal Hajus would have had if expected to say nice things about John Carter:
John Carter Film: Videos ~ Trailers ~ Interviews
http://www.cartermovie.com

Off-Site References:
Church in Wikipedia
Church in Youtube


*** "The Jaws of Death" was published on June 17, 1934, Hal Foster handled the illustration duties while George Carlin and Don Garden wrote the words.
The Jaws of Death: Full page in three sizes
http://www.erbzine.com/mag59/5978.html
The Hillman Key-in Summary is at:
http://www.erbzine.com/mag8/0815.html

ARTISTS WITH ERB-RELATED ART:
*** Charles Edmund Monroe was born in 1918. He created a series of Tarzan illustrations for Grosset and Dunlap books in the '40s and '50s
C.E. Monroe G&D cover illustrations
http://www.ERBzine.com/mag64/6415.html

*** Wallace Wood was born in 1927 and created famous SF and parody works. He was especially loved for his work in MAD and other comic magazines.
Junk Carter: Warmonger of Mars Parody
http://www.erbzine.com/mag55/5579.html


JUNE 18

Click or go to links referenced below for more info and larger images
*** They lined up and paid money to see Disney's "Tarzan" on June 18 in 1999, and they continued to do it as long as it ran in theatres. Then they bought the videotapes and DVDs, and then many watched "The Legend of Tarzan" series on TV and bought the straight-to-video sequels, "Tarzan and Jane" and "Tarzan II." Sheeta the leopard borrowed the name of Sabor the lioness for Disney's "Tarzan," but like the real-life spotted ones, the big cat was ever ready to pounce in Disney's "Tarzan."
Today, one can hardly visit any garage sale or swap meet in America without seeing a videotape or a DVD of Disney's "Tarzan" or its sequels on a table with other old movies people are trying to get rid of.
There was so much Disney "Tarzan" merchandise that even completists, more than a decade later, can't be certain they have it all and there's the frustration of knowing there are still the endless variations that were on the market in foreign countries. In fact, there was so much Disney Tarzan merchandise out there -- from toothpaste to chocolate drink mix to action figures and non-action figures to huge plush versions of Kala or Terkoz, big enough to take up half your couch all by themselves -- that many completists were cured once and for all of the completist bug.
I admit to having a few of these items myself, and I get a particular sense of satisfaction from seeing the Disney Tarzan Shaving Kit, still MIB, on a shelf. And sometimes in the evening, when Goro the Moon shines through the edges of the curtains into the living room where I am watching something other than Disney's "Tarzan" on TV, I have been known to make myself extra comfortable with a Disney "Tarzan" quilt lying across my legs. Those were heady times, and all because Disney finally had the good sense to bring ERB's major character to the screen while, at the same time, having the bad sense to alter the original story.
Many pages of Disney Tarzan features beginning at;
http://www.erbzine.com/mag1/0181.html
Legend of Tarzan TV Series: Episode Titles and Summaries
http://www.erbzine.com/mag0/0014.html
Q and A Session with the makers of Disney Tarzan
http://www.erbzine.com/mag2/0257.html
Tarak's Tarzan Review and Links
http://www.erbzine.com/mag0/0099.html

Off-Site References
Full Credits at IMDB
Film Trivia: 74 items in IMDB


*** Speaking of alterations, there was a "Sigh," or perhaps just a "Sy," as Weintraub announced on June 18, 1960, that Jane would conveniently disappear in his future Tarzan movies. "The kids of today want action and adventure," claims Weintraub, "and a bachelor figure is more exciting than a jungle suburbanite swinging home every night to tell his little woman what happened during the day."
Tarzan Says Goodbye To Jane: Star Weekly
http://www.erbzine.com/mag16/1655.html
The Film Janes from 1918: Photo Montage
http://www.erbzine.com/cards/film/janesfilmall.jpg

*** It is said that there are still people in America who never figured out that Tarzana, Calif., was named for ERB's Tarzan. But some were enlightened on June 18, 2005, when "Ripley's Believe It or Not" revealed that bit of information. In 1927, the residents petitioned for their own post office. It was at this time that it became necessary to find a new name for the community since there was already a Runnymede in California. A contest was held and the name Tarzana was accepted.
Story of Tarzana from our Tarzana Website
http://www.tarzana.ca/
ERBzine Weekly Webzine
http://www.erbzine.com/mag/ez050722.html
3 Puzzles for ERB Fans
http://www.erbzine.com/mag11/1138.html


JUNE 19
*** "Tarzan does not preach; he has no lesson to impart, no propaganda to disseminate. Yet, perhaps unconsciously, while seeking merely to entertain I have injected something of my own admiration for certain fine human qualities into these stories of the ape-man." So wrote ERB in an article titled "What Makes Tarzan Act That Way?" It was published June 19, 1938, in the Boston Sun Post
It has also appeared in other publications, including The Burroughs Bulletin #12, Old Series, in 1956, and is one of the articles posted here in ERBzine's ERB and the Press series
What Makes Tarzan Act That Way
http://www.erbzine.com/mag17/1788.html#act
Burroughs Bulletin Old Series: Covers and Contents
http://www.erbzine.com/mag15/1530.html
House of Greystoke Publications
http://www.erbzine.com/mag1/0195.html


*** Lou Gehrig, "The Iron Horse" of Major League Baseball, was born June 19 in 1903 and he would grow up to play baseball instead of Tarzan, although he yearned so much to don the leopard skin that he had several photos taken clad thus:
ERB/Baseball Connection with Lou Gehrig photos
http://www.erbzine.com/mag17/1709.html
See a full Gehrig Collage at:
http://www.erbzine.com/cards/eclectica/gehrigall.jpg
1937: "Birth of Tarzan by His  Poppa" appears in Script Magazine.

http://www.erbzine.com/mag2/0256.html#THE%20STORY%20OF
*** "Outback," by Gray Morrow and Don Kraar, began June 19, 1988, and ran for 12 Sundays.

Outback: All 12 of these Tarzan Sunday Strips
http://www.erbzine.com/mag35/3525.html
 
 
 


JUNE 20

Click or go to reference links below for more info and larger images.
Tarzan the Terrible 1st ~ Miles O'Keeffe ~ The ERB / German / Untamed Controversy ~ Kline's Planet of Peril ~ Tarzan Gold Key Comic
Political correctness has been around longer than most of us tend to think, but it has probably either been known by different names in the past or by no name at all. But it was there.
It is well known that public sentiment in America was running strongly against the German army during World War I, and Burroughs himself was of that mind when he began writing "Tarzan the Untamed" toward the end of World War I in 1918.
"Burroughs was fiercely patriotic all his life, and would often demonize America's wartime enemies in his writings....Later Burroughs regretted this when he became aware of the anti-Burroughs and anti-American sentiment in Germany caused by this title." -- Robert B. Zeuschner, "Edgar Rice Burroughs: The Bibliography." patricia olga, back story
In the meantime, though, he had continued the anti-German theme in "Tarzan the Terrible," the sequel to "Untamed," published in 1921.
The "political correctness" angle came about 10 years later, when Rex Maxon and R.W. Palmer reworked "Tarzan the Untamed" for the on-going daily Tarzan comic strips. It was still the basic story line of "Untamed," but the Germans in the story had morphed into the current enemy, the "Red Invaders" and the names of the German officers in ERB's story were changed to "Karzenoff" and "Petrovich," which sound more like Russian names, although Karzenoff had a middle name of Dmitrich, which sounds German or at least Eastern European.
Bertha Kircher, ERB's German spy, became Olga Boresch. In real life she was Patricia (Pat) Canby, like the character in ERB's book. But Palmer wrote that she was named Patricia Olga for her mother, Olga, who came from Russia. That is the first mention of Russia, which is the country most people think of when they think of Reds. Much later in the strip, there is flashback telling of Olga-Pat's time in Moscow.
This strip does include a few lengthy flashbacks about Olga-Pat's life, stories which took Tarzan offstage for a few weeks at a time. The strip also replaces ERB's Lt. Harold Percy Smith-Olwick with a pilot named Roger Cecil, a man out of Olga-Pat's past. Perhaps his name was an easier fit to the limited amount of words the comic strip captions could contain!
The comic strip version of "Tarzan the Untamed" does not include the second half of ERB's novel, where Tarzan, Bertha and Smith-Oldwick encounter the lost city of Xuja.
The sequel to ERB's original "Untamed," "Tarzan the Terrible," and the comic version of "Untamed," share an anniversary. The McClurg first edition of "Terrible" was published June 20, 1921, and the comic "Untamed" started June 20, 1932. There was a second McClurg printing of "Terrible," identifiable by the date of 1922 on the title page.
Tarzan the Terrible: History ~ Art ~ Reviews ~ Articles
http://www.erbzine.com/mag4/0494.html
Tarzan the Terrible: Read the Complete e-Text Edition
http://www.erbzine.com/craft/t8tte.html
THE ERB / GERMANY INCIDENT: A 6-Part Series
ERB 'Make War' on Kaiser the 'World Devourer'
 http://www.erbzine.com/mag32/3294.html
Tarzan the Untamed: ERB C.H.A.S.E.R. Biblio
http://www.erbzine.com/mag4/0493.html
Tarzan the Untamed: Rex Maxon Daily Strips
http://www.erbzine.com/mag32/3229.html

Off-Site References:
ERBfirsts page
Terrible Summary


*** Miles O'Keeffe, who began his film career playing the strong, silent jungle hero in 1981's "Tarzan the Ape-Man," was born this date in 1954 in Ripley, Tenn.
Anyone possessing a library of O'Keeffe movies would no doubt be a fan of his many action films.
Tarzan The Ape Man 1981
http://www.erbzine.com/mag21/2150.html
Miles O'Keeffe Tribute Photo Collage
http://www.erbzine.com/cards/film/milesall.jpg

Off-Site Reference:
O'Keeffe at IMDB


*** 1929: The Planet of Peril, a Venus novel by Otis Adelbert Kline is serialized in Argosy All-Story. ERB's plans for his Venus series are set back.
Otis Albert Kline's Venus by Den Valdron
http://www.erbzine.com/mag15/1511.html
Planet of Peril: Read our e-Text Edition
http://www.erbzine.com/craft/oakplanet.html
*** "Tarzan and the Preserver," by John Celardo
and Dick Van Buren, began June 20 in 1955 and ran for 62 days.

Tarzan and the Preserver: All 62 daily Celardo strips:
http://www.erbzine.com/mag38/3848.html


JUNE 21

Click or go to reference links below for more info and larger images.
Baby Danton with Grandparents, Parents, brother John, Sister Dian, Cousin Mike ~ Portrait by Dad John Coleman Burroughs
With ERB, Inc. Office Memorabilia ~ By Tarzana Office Tree ~ Capra Autograph & Meeting ~ My last photo of Dan
Danton Burroughs was born to John Coleman and Jane Ralston Burroughs in Los Angeles on June 21, 1944, and was a terrific representative and promoter of the works of his grandfather, Edgar Rice Burroughs.
The ERB world was surprised and saddened by his unexpected death at the relatively young age of 63 a decade ago on May 15, 2008. He had been suffering from Parkinson's disease and had also just experienced the trauma of seeing some irreplacable ERB memorabilia destroyed in a fire, factors which may have contributed to his sudden passing.
Fans and family dearly wish there had been opportunity to share more time with him and he with all, including grandchildren. He would have loved to participate in the great achievements of his worthy successors at ERB Inc. over the past several years.
Happy Birthday Dan
http://www.erbzine.com/danton/birthday.html
Danton Through the Years I
http://www.erbzine.com/mag34/3419.html
Danton Through the Years II
http://www.erbzine.com/mag34/3420.html
Danton Burroughs Memorial
http://www.erbzine.com/dantonburroughs/
Our Danton Burroughs Tribute Website
http://www.dantonburroughs.com

Off-Site Reference
Danton's LA Times Obituary


1944: Ed celebrated the birth of his grandson, Danton, with Frank Capra at the Outrigger. From Ed's letter to daughter Joan: "I met Col. Frank Capra the other evening and all evening until midnight, and that I had him at lunch at the Outrigger Canoe Club yesterday. Almost from the first it was "Frank" and "Edgar". I think he is a very swell person with a great sense of humor (he laughed at my sallies).  He told me the first evening that he had heard a lot about Hully and his work, and of course that endeared him to me immediately."
ERB's Letter Reference to his Capra Meeting
http://www.erbzine.com/mag27/440623lt.jpg
ERB's 1944 Wartime Letters
http://www.erbzine.com/mag10/1026.html
ERB Bio Timeline
http://www.erbzine.com/bio/years40.html

*** "It Happened One Night" ~ "You Can't Take It With You" ~ "Mr. Smith Goes to Washington" ~ "It's A Wonderful Life."
Frank Capra tended to direct major movies that had titles which were complete sentences. He never did a Tarzan movie, but if he had the title might have been something such as: "The Ape Man Rides the Herd" or "It's a Jungle Out There."
Though Capra had no Tarzan movie credits himself, he did meet Tarzan's creator, Edgar Rice Burroughs, who had become the oldest and most senior war correspondent in the Pacific Theater in World War II. The two men met June 21, 1944, and we know they did because he signed ERB's autograph book with the notation "S.C., Col.," the S.C. standing for Signal Corps.
Like ERB himself (both were past the normal age of enlistment), he sought various ways of helping his country respond to the Japanese sneak attack on Pearl Harbor. Capra abandoned his successful directing career and his presidency of the Screen Directors Guild within four days of the start of the war and received a commission as a major in the Army.
During the next four years of World War II, Capra's job was to head a special section on morale to explain to soldiers "why the hell they're in uniform", writes Capra, and they were not "propaganda" films like those created by the Nazis and Japan. Capra directed or co-directed seven documentary war information films in the "Why We Fight" series.
Frank Capra's Autograph from ERB's Collection
http://www.erbzine.com/mag27/2792.html
Edgar Rice Burroughs: The War Years
http://www.ERBzine.com/war

Off-Site Reference:
Capra Bio in IMDB


*** "Tarzan the Magnificent," by William Juhre and Don Garden, began in the daily comics section June 21, 1937, and ran for 96 days.
Tarzan the Magnificent: Read all 96 of these daily strips
http://www.erbzine.com/mag40/4047.html


VISIT JUNE WEEK 3 PHOTO ALBUM
www.ERBzine.com/mag63/6333pics.html

BACK TO JUNE WEEK II
www.ERBzine.com/mag63/6332.html

BACK TO MONTHLY EVENTS INTRO and CONTENTS
www.ERBzine.com/events



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