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Since 1996 ~ Over 10,000 Webpages in Archive
Volume 3298
THE EDGAR RICE BURROUGHS / GERMAN CONFLICT
RESOURCES


TARZAN THE UNTAMED: FIRST TIME IN PRINT

Blue Book April 1919 ad for Red Book AppearanceAll-Story Weekly: 1920 March 20, 27 ~ April 3, 10, 17 ~ Tarzan and the Valley of LunaJ. Allen St. John Dust Jacket Painting for Tarzan the Untamed
PULP DEBUT
Red Book Magazine: 1919 March through August ~ Tarzan the Untamed ~ Charles Livingston Bull: 25 b/w illustrations
All-Story Weekly: 1920 March 20, 27 ~ April 3, 10, 17 ~ Tarzan and the Valley of Luna ~ P.J. Monahan: March 20 cover ~ no interiors
FIRST EDITION
A.C. McClurg: April 30, 1920 ~ 428 pages ~ 1st. Ed. Print Run: 77,000 ~ Total: 299,500  Heins word count: 110,000 ~  J. Allen St. John: DJ and nine interior sepia plates


ERB MAKE WAR

LOST WORDS OF ERB
Patriotic Articles and Short Stories from the Great War
  • Came the War (WWI): Unpublished? - 2,700 words
  • The Little Door: A WWI propaganda piece - November 17-23, 1917: ERBzine 0034
  • To the Mother | To the Home Girl | To the Woman on the Town ~ Patriotic, 400-word open letter articles submitted to newspapers in the Fall of 1917: ERBzine 1169
  • Wanted -- Good Citizens: A call for volunteers for the Illinois Reserve Militia, Oak Park, Illinois: Oak Leaves ~ 1918
  • What is the Matter with the US Army: WWI Article ~ 1918
  • Go to Pershing: WWI Article ~ 1918
  • Do Boys Make Good Soldiers: Article written August-September 1918 for Oak Leaves
  • Patriotism by Proxy: May 22, 1918 -Oak Leaves - Oak Park, Illinois ~ May 25, 1918: ERBzine 1696
  • Home Guarding for the Liberty Loan: WWI Speech delivered at Flag Day exercises - Oak Park, Illinois ~ June 14, 1918
  • A National Reserve Army Proposed: Army and Navy Journal ~ August 31, 1918: ERBzine 0031
  • Prominent, Popular Oak Park Man Honored: The Oak Parker ~ Vol. 34, No. 25, Oak Park, Illinois - September 28, 1918: ERBzine 0062
  • Peace and the Militia: The Oak Parker ~ November 16, 1918 - Article
  • Victory Loan: An Appeal to Our Business Sense - Various newspapers ~ March 1919: ERBzine 1683
"Who's Who in Oak Park"
"Little  Ol' Buck Private" (poem)
"For the Victory Loan" (poem)
THE WWI NOVELS
Amazing: February 1927 - Land That Time Forgot
The Land That Time Forgot
PD eText Edition
C.H.A.S.E.R.
John Coleman Burroughs art: Big Little Book
Tarzan the Untamed
PD eText Edition
C.H.A.S.E.R.


ANTI-GERMAN SENTIMENT IN THE USA DURING THE GREAT WAR

WWI Anti-German Sentiment: Wikipedia

When the United States entered the war in 1917, some German immigrants, and sometimes even non-German immigrants who were perceived as German (Dutch, Scandinavian, Swiss), were looked upon with suspicion and attacked regarding their loyalty. Some German immigrants in the United States were even tried, convicted and imprisoned, on charges of sedition, merely for refusing to swear allegiance to the United States war effort. The Hindu German Conspiracy Trial received widespread press coverage in 1917-18.

City streets in Chicago with German names were changed, with several noted exceptions being Goethe and Schiller in the Gold Coast neighborhood (which remain the same today).

The city of Berlin, Michigan was renamed Marne, though the Berlin Raceway located there retains the original city name.

In New Orleans, Berlin St. was renamed for General Pershing (head of the American Expeditionary Force), sauerkraut came to be called (by some) "liberty cabbage", German measles became "liberty measles", hamburgers became "liberty sandwiches" and Dachshunds became "liberty pups".

In the United States between 1917–18, German-American schools and newspapers by the thousands were forced to permanently close. In cities and towns across the nation, libraries burned their German-language books in public burnings. The officials of German-named towns that had been founded by German-Americans were intimidated by county, state, and federal government officials into anglicizing their names, and into destroying all traces of their German heritage. In cities across the United States, German-sounding street names were banned. Many families with a German-sounding last name changed their surname. The vast majority of German-Americans, however, were loyal to their adopted country and thousands of them served in the United States military.

Newspapers in New York and other places published lists of inhabitants names and addresses, labeled as Enemy Aliens, thereby inviting neighbors to hostile actions.

As the public atmosphere became increasingly hysterical, vigilantes burned "pro-German" books, spied on neighbors, and attacked and murdered immigrants and radicals. Anti-German tension culminated on April 4, 1918, in the brutal lynching of German immigrant Robert Prager, a coal miner living in Collinsville, Illinois, who was accused of making "disloyal remarks". In June 1918 a bill was introduced in the House of Representatives by Representative John M. C. Smith with the aim to wipe out German names from the map of the United States.


MORE ON THE ERB/GERMANY CONTROVERSY

The Controversy as described at Wikipedia:

Tarzan the Untamed was one of Burroughs’ most controversial novels. The controversy stemmed from his blanket portrayal of Germans as stereotypical, unredeemable villains, one that was also extended to his contemporary science fiction novel The Land That Time Forgot. This portrayal, while perhaps understandable in wartime, ultimately ruined the market for his writing in Germany, where the character of Tarzan had formerly been quite popular. Burroughs’ later introduction of heroic Germans into his subsequent novels Tarzan and the Lost Empire, Tarzan at the Earth’s Core and Back to the Stone Age did little to repair the damage to his reputation there.

Tarzan himself, unusually, is recast from his typical role as a noble and high-minded hero into that of a very human being so unhinged by grief as to blame a whole nation for the crimes of a few of its people, and to commit atrocities in consequence. His simple, direct and savage campaign against the enemy comes across as crude in comparison with Bertha's espionage, with which it ironically interferes. Tarzan's recovery of something approaching his normal status is attained only gradually. The parallel encounters with the two lions highlight his dual role; in the first, the lion is treated with cruelty, as an enemy and a tool against other enemies; in the second compassion prevails, and the lion is befriended and becomes a willing ally.

Regardless of its flaws, Tarzan the Untamed is an important work in the Tarzan series. It begins a sequence continuing with Tarzan the Terrible, Tarzan and the Golden Lion and Tarzan and the Ant Men in which Burroughs' vivid imagination and storytelling abilities hit their peak, and which is generally considered a highlight of the series.

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STEPHEN SOREL aka CARL STEPHENSON
Stephen Sorel
Stephenson was born in Austria in 1893, and lived in Austria and Germany all his life. He was the head of a respected publishing house, with branches in Berlin and Vienna, that published many German works of literature, as well as German translations of English, French, and American writers (such as Laurence Sterne and Mark Twain); many of these translations were performed by Stephenson himself. He also wrote several books, mostly of a satirical or critical nature, both under his own name and under the pseudonym of Stephen Sorel. The “Sorel” titles were all written in the 1920s and included two books about Edgar Rice Burroughs’ Tarzan, one a parody (Tarzan hat geträumt! (Die Tarzan-Parodie) 1924) and the other a critical commentary, and an apparent fantasy tale called A Chase Through the Afterlife

“Leiningen Versus the Ants” is arguably one of the most famous short adventure stories ever written. It is often anthologized right alongside “The Most Dangerous Game” and the stories of Jack London. It still finds its way into high-school English classes. It’s a favorite of most radio buffs, due to its dramatization on Escape, and well-known to movie buffs through the film adaptation The Naked Jungle, produced by George Pal and starring Charlton Heston. 


PROPAGANDA POSTERS FROM THE GREAT WAR



Strong Arms of Canada
1915 Australian Anti-German Button


EAST AFRICA IMAGE GALLERY


Click for full size
 


Askari company, c. 1914/18


German Artillery On the Move
German Schutztruppe with Königsberg gun


Men of the 1/4th King’s African Rifles at Njombe, German East Africa.
Formed at the beginning of the century from tribesmen in
British East Africa (now Kenya) and Uganda, the KAR
bore the brunt of most of the fighting during the campaign.


Germans firing

German East Africa Coin and flag


TARZAN THE UNTAMED ONLINE

E-TEXT
Read the PD e-text edition of Tarzan the Untamed at ERBzine
http://www.erbzine.com/craft/t7tu.html
Click the CRAFT menu in the logo at the top of 
every one of our 10,000 pages
to see more e-texts and publishing information.
Refer to our ERB C.H.A.S.E.R. Illustrated Bibliography 
to see the entry for
Tarzan the Untamed


FOLLOW-UP ADAPTATIONS IN COMICS

John Coleman Burroughs art: Big Little Book
Big Little Book Cover
REX MAXON DAILY STRIPS
Interestingly, publication of Tarzan the Untamed has resumed publication. 

However, in the 1932/33 adaptation of the story in newspaper strips by Rex Maxon, the military villains were changed to Russian Reds.

Many changes were made in the plot line as can be seen in the strips featured in ERBzine, starting at:
 www.erbzine.com/mag32/3229.html

These strips will be released over the next month in ERBzine

.
Gold Key 163Gold Key 164
Gold Key Tarzan Comic Nos. 163 and 164
GOLD KEY TARZAN COMICS WITH MANNING ART
Tarzan #163-164, dated January-March 1968
(script by Gaylord DuBois, art by Russ Manning),
published by Gold Key Comics
Years later when much of the furor had cooled a  Manning/DuBois adaptation of the story returned the German army officers as villains.

Eliminated or tamed down were the more extreme sequences involving lions vs. the villains. 

http://www.erbzine.com/mag25/2563.html
http://www.erbzine.com/mag25/2564.html

.
DC TARZAN COMICS
The most recent comics adaptation was by DC comics: Tarzan #250-256, dated June-December 1976 (script by Gerry Conway and Denny O'Neill, art by José Luis García-López and others). This adaptation followed the book more closely than the previous ones, although it by-passed the events in Tarzan the Terrible -- Tarzan and Jane were re-united at the end of the "Untamed" adventure.
DC 250DC 251DC 252
DC 253DC 255Dell 256


WEB LINKS OF INTEREST

ERBzine Refs
ERB: The War Years

Lost Words of ERB
ERB's personal correspondence
Tarzan the Untamed
PD eText Edition
C.H.A.S.E.R.
Maxon Daily Strips
Manning Gold Key Comic
Tarzan and The War Against the Hun 
  
The Land That Time Forgot
PD eText Edition
C.H.A.S.E.R.

McWhorter Memorial Edgar Rice Burroughs Collection
Enid Markey
The Moon Maid
ERB in the US 7th Cavalry, Arizona
Hillmans' visit to Ackermansion in 1999
Darrell Richardson


OFF SITE REFS

Stefan Sorel (Carl Stephenson)
Tarzan the Untamed Controversy in Wikipedia
Wikipedia: Anti-German Sentiment
Forry Ackerman in Wikipedia
Nostalgia League
Video tours of Ackermansion on YouTube

German East Africa
East Africa Campaign
German East Africa Flags
History of German East Africa

TEXT REFS
Danton Burroughs Tarzana Archives and Letters
Heins' Golden Anniversary Bibliography of Edgar Rice Burroughs 
Irwin Porges: The Man Who Created Tarzan
John Taliaferro: Tarzan Forever
Robert Fenton: ERB and Tarzan - Edited by George T. McWhorter


THE ERB / GERMANY CONTROVERSY

I. The Incident
II. Wahrman-Ackerman: Translator
III. Tarzan: German-Devourer I
IV. Tarzan: German-Devourer II
Conclusion
V. Resources: Notes | Bio
Illos | Posters | Texts | Comics | Links
VI. Leiningen Versus the Ants
Short Story | Script | Radio Show
.
Armada of ERB Web Sites
From
Tarzana, California
tarzan.ca
The Fantastic Worlds of Edgar Rice Burroughs
Tarzan.com
Tarzan.com
ERBzine Weekly Webzine
ERBzine.com
Danton Burroughs Website: Tarzana Treasure Vaults
DantonBurroughs.com
Tarzan.org
Tarzan.org
Burroughs Bibliophiles
BurroughsBibliophiles.com
John Coleman Burroughs Tribute Site
JohnColemanBurroughs.com
Tarzine: Official Monthly Webzine of ERB, Inc.
Tarzan.com/tarzine
John Carter of Mars
JohnCarterOfMars.ca
Edgar Rice Burroughs
EdgarRiceBurroughs
ERBzine Weekly Webzine
Weekly Webzine
Danton Burroughs Weekly Webzine
Weekly Webzine
Pellucidar
Pellucidar.org
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