Volume 1835
Georges Dodds'
The Ape-Man: his Kith and Kin
A collection of texts which prepared the advent of Tarzan of the Apes by Edgar Rice Burroughs
Presents
http://www.erbzine.com/mag18/jocko.htm

Jocko, or the Monkey from Brazil

Jules Joseph Gabriel de Lurieu and
Claude Louis Marie de Rochefort-Luçay

Georges Dodds, transl.


Author(s)
Jules Joseph Gabriel de Lurieu ('Gabriel' -- 1792-1869) was a popular and prolific French playwright. He, in collaboration with others wrote Trois jours en une heure (1830), Joséphine, ou le retour de Wagram (1830), Le Grand Prix, ou Le voyage à frais communs (1831), and Le lait d'ânesse (1846), amongst many other plays.

Claude Louis Marie de Rochefort-Luçay ('Rochefort' --- 1790 1871) began his career as a salesman in a bookstore, then was employed in the Interior Ministry. Under the Restoration he became secretary to the governor of Reunion Island. Back in Paris he joined Martainville at the Drapeau Blanc and associated himself with royalist authors. He wrote, alone or in collaboration with others, a number of vaudeville plays including Pages et les poissardes en deux actes (1840), La Mère Saint-Martin ou le Diable sen mêle (1841), and Les Mystères de Passy (1844).
Biographical material drawn from here

Link to Tarzan of the Apes

Play derivative of, but distinct from C.M. Pougens' Jocko, where a capuchin monkey saves a Brazilian planter's young child, when the ship he is on runs aground

Edition(s) used

Modifications to the text



Jocko, or the Monkey from Brazil


Character Actors
JOCKO Mr. Mazurier
FERNANDEZ, Portuguese trader, dealing in rice Mr. Robert
PEDRO, Fernandez's elderly servant Mr. Pierson
DOMINIC, Pedro's son, a bit of a simpleton Mr. Paul
CORA, Fernandez's young Brazilian slave Miss Louise Pierson
FERNAND, Seven year old son of Fernandez Miss Charlotte Bordes
A BRAZILIAN, a speaking part Mr. Blanchard
A young woman, non-speaking part
Sailors, Brazilians, Creoles and Blacks

The action takes place in Brazil, near the Para


BALLET.

Pas de trois, Brazilian.



Mr. Mazilier. Misses Louise Pierson, Adèle.

Pas de six. (Le Chica.)

Mr. Dumas, Lalande, Arès, Mrs. Gratienne, Bernard, Marivin

TWO BRAZILIAN CHILDREN,

Little Lingot, and little Sophie

The entire ballet troup


JOCKO
or
THE MONKEY FROM BRASIL,

a drama in two acts.


ACT I.


The stage represents a pretty site in the colonies; to the right, the entrance to a bamboo forest; in the background, on the same side, a large tamarind tree extends to the middle of the stage, with some branches hanging towards the ground. A large net is extended across the middle of the tree, large enough that one can sit on it and hide there. To the left, a small bamboo hut crowned with a cluster of palm trees; on the front a bell hanging from a post. In the distance one can make out a rice paddy. It is nine o'clock in the morning.

SCENE I.

DOMINIC, Brazilians (male and female), Creoles and Blacks

Upon the curtain's rising, the Brazilians have just finished their first tasks of the day, and are playing games. The dances begin. Two young Brazilians beat on tambourines, the Chica, a native dance, is performed. In the forefront, to the right, sitting on bulrush mats and busy making a necklace with red beads.

DOMINIC, getting to his feet

My necklace is done. I hope my dear little Cora will be pleased when I give it to her ~ But why is she not here, she who so loves the dance! And papa besides, he is late too ~ I'll go find him. Go on my friends, I'll soon be back.

Exit stage left. The dances spring up again. Cora arrives, she seems worried: she sees the necklace which Dominique has left on the bulrush mat and takes it. She tosses the necklace away in a fit of jealousy; soon she joins in the Brazilians' games and dances. At the end of the ballet she goes off with her young friends.


SCENE II.

PEDRO, DOMINIC, Brazilians (male and female)

PEDRO

 Let's go mates, it's been a good two hours since you left the rice paddy which ought to have been harvested by now . . . it's time to get back to work . . . you know I can't abide laziness. (He extends his arms.)

DOMINIC

I bet, papa, you've been sleeping.

PEDRO

It's true, I took advantage of the absence of our master Don Fernandez to take a good nap. He yawns Ah! I certainly did indulge myself. It's so bloody hot in this damn country! Thirty degree! . . . It gives one the shakes to think about it. (to a Brazilian) You, wait for me over there. There's a chest which contains some items sent to our master, you'll help me bring it here.
All the Brazilians exit stage left, taking their tools with them.


SCENE III.

PEDRO, DOMINIC

PEDRO

.
Stay Dominic, I wish to speak with you; As I am your father and no one has yet dared to question my title, When you don't ~ when you don't doing anything, I have the right to demand to know what you are doing, and in particular what you have accomplished since this morning.

DOMINIC

Before leaving your home, I first dusted all of your master's Natural History collection, put away all his shells, lined up his lovely collection of parrots on the shelves; it look fabulous now.

PEDRO

You're not telling me you've been up since six this morning . . . and that you've started a necklace.

DOMINIC

For Cora, I forgot; here, isn't it pretty? (He shows the necklace)

PEDRO

Might you be in love with her?

DOMINIC

I do think so, I'm crazy about her!

PEDRO

My word, that's rich; maybe you think I brought you out all the way out here from Lisbon just to fall head-over-heels with that little Brazilian girl?

DOMINIC

Golly! she's so pretty!

PEDRO

I'm not saying she isn't . . .  but you don't know what it's like to fall for a beautiful woman . . .  Your mother was also pretty . . .  and I well know what that got me; besides, I don't wish my son to marry beneath his station. I forbid you to give it another thought.

DOMINIC

Aw! c'mon dad

PEDRO

From now on, if I see you give the least little glance towards her, I'm sending you back to Portugal.

DOMINIC

What! You're going to insist upon it?

PEDRO

If I followed Don Fernandez here, if I agreed to oversee his slaves, if I involved you in my responsibility to watch over our master's property, I have not and will never forget the distance which exists between we Europeans and the natives of this country.  One must show our pride, my dear Dominic; do you hear me, my boy ~ I know we're not much to talk about, that we are nothing, but we must hold to our rank.

DOMINIC

Ah! Don't worry papa, I love my little Cora, but I might never receive anything in return; her character is so flighty!  You know, all she lives for is the hunt, ever day she comes to hunt all the beasts in the forest, and when I want to talk to her of my love

PEDRO

She hunts you like the rest. Whatever, I still don't want to see you two together; one never knows what might happen.   But here comes our master.


SCENE IV.

The Preceding, FERNANDEZ
(Without seeing Pedro, he enters, holding a letter in his hand

FERNANDEZ

.
The arrival of this letter fulfils all my wishes, the worries I had regarding the success of my commercial operations are flown. (Turning) Why it's you, Pedro; hear what brings me such happiness, I will soon embrace my wife and son.

PEDRO

Can it be?

FERNANDEZ

My beloved son! Ah! this news makes me forget all the troubles I've had trying to set up a business here, the success of which is still doubtful.

PEDRO

Indeed, so much the better!  And who brought you this good news?

FERNANDEZ

The Portuguese vessel which just brought in the new governor of Brazil.

PEDRO

I don't know if I would recognize your little Fernand. All I can remember is that he was a good boy.

DOMINIQUE

He was only three when we left Lisbon. How old might he be now?

PEDRO

That's easy to figure out, we've been here a year.

DOMINIQUE

He would be just about four and a half.

FERNANDEZ

I've been informed that my wife has inherited from her uncle the seaman, and will arrive here on a ship which belongs to her.

PEDRO

Why, that uncle was so rich! (In a happy tone) Ah! good God, what a happy circumstance.

FERNANDEZ

Pedro.

PEDRO, (changing his tone)

What a happy circumstance it is that you have inherited, but how sad it is that he has died.

FERNANDEZ

Friends, I wish to organize a little party for my dear Irma, and I'm counting on you to help me a little with the preparations, but time is short, she cannot be any less than ten days at sea; this letter was dated the eleventh, and we are the twentieth, within twenty-four hours maybe.

PEDRO

Yes we'll celebrate her, our good mistress. I can already imagine all our workers weaving garlands and their wives arranging bouquets . . .  Come on, Dominic, you have to show yourself, my boy, let us show that when the opportunity comes to please our good master, we do not squander it.

DOMINIC

We'll drink, we'll laugh; will you sing, father?

PEDRO

To our heart's content, but I'm off right away to join our workers, to come to an agreement with them, for I am here commander, singer, music conductor and master of ceremonies. There'd enough to lose one's head over, had one no head to lose. (He leaves abruptly


SCENE V.

FERNANDEZ, DOMINIC

FERNANDEZ

Stay with me Dominic. Tell me, have you little Cora, my lovely huntress, this morning?

DOMINIC

No sir, she's been running about the woods since the crack of dawn. I did go to look for her, but I did not catch her; she's lighter on her feet than the birds she chases -- and I, I dare not go into the forest; there are so many monkeys -- so many monkeys.

FERNANDEZ

Do those animals scare you?

DOMINIC

Sir, I won't lie ~ I still can't get used to the faces they make, and add to that that some of them aren't very nice . . .

FERNANDEZ

Ah! ah! my dear boy, your fear makes me laugh . . .  the monkeys have more wit than they have wickedness, and their agility is very often entertaining

DOMINIC

Yes, especially when they show you their teeth, like the one which lurks around her every day, and which my father wishes to capture.

FERNANDEZ

I see that you would be quite surprised to hear the adventure I had

DOMINIC

With a monkey?

FERNANDEZ

Listen. About 6 months ago, tormented by the desire to discover novel artefacts of Natural History, I directed my walks towards the knoll in the Great Savannah, hoping to find by the sea, some of those shells which make up my collection. Suddenly, some sharp cries strike my ear, I draw near and see a huge snake locked in mortal combat with a rather large ape, known under the species name Jocko. The venomous reptile leaves his victim to strike out at me . . .

DOMINIC

Oh! my God!

FERNANDEZ

I was armed. I shot at it and killed it. Jocko, covered in blood stayed put, his torn and bruised ribcage beating strongly. The common danger we had faced inspired me to take great interest in him. I bandaged his wounds, and soon had him completely healed. The poor creature once given back his life understood that he owed it to me, but did not know how express his thanks  He became my student. In following all my orders, and anticipating my thoughts he gave me so many examples of his intelligence, that I decided to obtain further proofs thereof by teaching him several tricks which he performs at my command.

DOMINIC

Why, sir, you were able?

FERNANDEZ

Every day I go and spend an hour with him, near his hut, for I do not wish to rob him of his liberty. I have brought him a few instruments he needs for his exercises. This occupation has become a pleasure both lively and new, such that I devote myself to it wholeheartedly.

DOMINIC

I think you're awfully kind, sir, to provide a monkey with a one-on-one education.

FERNANDEZ

Ah! my friend, you don't know the whole ofit ~

DOMINIC

What else then?

FERNANDEZ, aside.

I must be careful, I might have revealed something. (Out loud. It is that I intend to write his story, and if one day I can incite my readers to share in the fascination Jocko deserves, I won't exactly have wasted my time

DOMINIC

It will be rather difficult, sir, for who the devil would be interested in a monkey! . . . if it were a bear, or an elephant, I don't say . . . for they are creatures which occupy a certain rank amongst their peers, but a capuchin monkey ... come on!

FERNANDEZ

Nevertheless we'll see . . . but I see your father, follow me. I want to visit the nearby rice harvest; we'll come back soon.

DOMINIC

That's it, we might even meet Miss Cora on our way
(They exit left, headed towards the back of the stage and the rice paddy)


SCENE VI.

PEDRO, two Blacks, carrying a chest.
(They enter from the right.)

PEDRO

.
This way my friends, this way . . . put the chest down. (The blacks put it down) Good . . .  (The blacks leave) My goodness, it's a good thing our master's wife has sent us all this. (He opens the chest), for there isn't a tailor here who can make suits like this. They'll have to air out before they are taken in, the salt air has probably damaged them quite a bit. (One hears cries from outside) What do these cries mean?

(He heads towards the back of the stage, several Brazilians enter from the right, and move quickly towards Pedro.)


SCENE VII.

PEDRO, the Brazilian

A BRAZILIAN

Mr. Pedro, it's that damn monkey that has just shown up at the entrance of our field. He scares all our women. Ah! if only I had caught him . . .
(Here Jocko quickly crosses the stage from right to left and hides behind the clump of palm trees)

PEDRO

It's been several days since he's come over on this side . . .  you said he wasn't very far, all the better . . .  if only I can catch him in the trap I have set up around this tamarind tree. (He shows the tree, which is to the left)

THE BRAZILIAN

There's your big green net.

PEDRO

That rascal steals everything when he comes down around here.

THE BRAZILIAN

I'd sure like to see him caught and our prisoner . . .

PEDRO

He rather likes the fruit of this tree (Jocko watches Pedro very attentively). Let him come, my net is spread . . .  (The Brazilians watch the net, Jocko's eyes follows Pedro's every move.) And by pulling on this little cord. (He pulls the cord, the net closes up) Snap, and there's Jocko captured.
(Jocko, still in the same spot, mimics Pedro's every move)

THE BRAZILIAN

It would be funny if he was caught alive . . .

PEDRO

Were he there, in my net, I would serenade him which has been written about him

THE BRAZILIAN

It's a nice song that one, I've heard little Cora sing it

PEDRO

By little Cora, pah! she can't sing like me . . . Listen, my friends, I will entertain you with it right now.

[Musical score omitted, lyrics only]

Who roams the savannah,
Ravages our orchards?
Who eats our bananas,
Destroys our orange trees?
Who interrupts our celebrations,
Makes the young maidens
Run off to their lover's arms?
It is Jocko --
It's Jocko, it's Jocko, it's Jocko
Who passes himself off as a beast,
But who can, you see,
Hold his own against all of us, yes
Hold his own against all of us

       Second verse

Who know full well how to escape
From every ambush,
Who gives of the bastinado
To all who try to catch him.
Bold thief who
With a happy demeanour
Pays with a smirk,
What he steals under our very eyes
It is Jocko --
It's Jocko, it's Jocko, it's Jocko
Who passes himself off as a beast,
But who can, you see,
Hold his own against all of us, yes
Hold his own against all of us

       CHORUS OF BRAZILIANS

But who can, you see,
Hold his own against
All of us

       Third verse

What invisible imp,
By a din beyond compare
Troubles the slumber
Of the peaceful Creole;
Who reawakens the fire,
Of sleeping spouses?
Who wakes the wives,
To berate their husbands?
It is Jocko --
It's Jocko, it's Jocko, it's Jocko
Who passes himself off as a beast,
But who can, you see,
Hold his own against all of us, yes
Hold his own against all of us

       CHORUS OF BRAZILIANS

But who can, you see,
Hold his own against
All of us

(At the end of each verse Jocko climbs a tree, moves about and jumps from branch to branch. When he hears his name spoken he must make faces and show himself to be paying attention. All these games remain unseen by the characters on stage)

THE BRAZILIAN

Goodbye Mr, Pedro, see you tonight

PEDRO

Until tonight, my friends. (False exit). Oh by the way, don't forget to come around after work, I have something to impart to you regarding a small celebration we will be hosting here. Everybody will have to lend a hand.

THE BRAZILIAN

You can count on us, Mr. Pedro. (They all leave


SCENE VIII.

PEDRO, JOCKO, in a tree

PEDRO

.
Ah! while I'm alone, how about having my morning snack . . .  besides I'm dying of thirst. (He takes up a basket he has brought). Here's an excellent bottle of spirits, some dried fruit, and some cream.  This cream will be delicious. (He puts the jar down beside him) But first, a drink. (He sees his spilled bottle) Well! What's the meaning of this? ( Jocko plays the same trick with the jar of cream.). There are my spirits and cream spilled . . .  how clumsy of me; here am I reduced to eating some rather dry dates . . . how refreshing!

(During this monologue, Jocko has drawn near the chest and acquired himself himself a large evening jacket and a hat which Pedro had left out to air in a preceding scene.

PEDRO, seeing him from behind

Ah! there's a stranger over there. (He gets up) Where in blazes did that man come from? I don't know him . . .  I bet it is someone associated with the new governor . . .  I must present him with my regards . . .  Why, sir . . . Does he not hear me? . . .  Sir . . .  I am most honoured to offer you my welcome. (He doffs his hat, the monkey does the same; they look at each other, face to face; Pedro screams.) Heavens, what the blazes is that? . . .  It's the monkey, (He runs over to the chest) with my master's clothes . . . wait, just you wait, you're dealing with me now.
(He runs after Jocko, and grabs hold of the tails of the jacket which he has put on. He makes him spin around several times. Jocko shifts his arms and they slip from the jacket. Pedro, still holding it, falls to the ground. Jocko makes faces at him.)

PEDRO, getting back to his feet

That's it, I'm not going to let you get away. (He takes hold of a bamboo rod and tries to hit Jocko. The monkey avoids the blows and finally takes the stick himself. (Screaming.) OW! ow! I'm done for, I'll never manage to get him . . . My word, run!

(Jocko chases him, he exits left)

SCENE IX.

JOCKO, remaining behind, alone

(He leaps and gambols about, he picks up all the breakfast ware, shows his agility in using them, takes the little basket, turns it over, looks at it, makes himself a cowl with it. Here one sees an arrow shot from outside the stage which comes to rest at Jocko's feet. The monkey becomes nervous, looks in every direction, sees Cora, and climbs back in the tree to hide.


SCENE X.

CORA, she runs up, holding a bow and carrying a quiver.

(Spitefully)Damn parrot! I missed it again . . . I'm awfully clumsy this morning, I could have sworn that my arrow was going to strike it . . . it will be awhile before I see the likes of it again . . .  a superb haras parrot, which I wished to offer Don Fernandez, to add to his great collection . . . and, it is Mr. Dominic's fault, he was running after me, he wanted to kiss me (turning around). Here he comes again, I want to sulk a little . . . no, let's hide instead . . . there . . . in that tamarind tree . . .  he won't be able to see me, and I'll be able to continue my hunt when he goes home.
(She climbs the tamarind tree in which Pedro has set up his net)


SCENE XI.

CORA, in the tree, DOMINIC.
He runs headlong onto the scene, looking around him
 

DOMINIC

I did see her . . .  I'll bet she's hiding in some bush (Calling out)Miss Cora! Miss Cora! show yourself, I have something wonderful to tell you, something that will make you very happy. (Cora shifts in the tree, she drops her bow, which fall at the base of the tree.) (Dominc turns) Ah! I was sure I would find you.

CORA

Leave me alone, sir, I don't want to speak to you.

DOMINIC

I'll say, you sure missed that parrot, didn't you?

CORA

Shut up, blabbermouth, if I get down I won't miss you

DOMINIC, drawing near the tamarind tree

Please get down

CORA

When you will have left

DOMINIC

.
But I love you so much

CORA

I liked you a bit too, but now I can't stand you.

DOMINIC

Allow me only to offer you this necklace that I made especially for you.

CORA, changing her tone

A necklace . . .  It is pretty . . .  but I don't wish to accept it.
(The moment Dominic prepares to climb the tree, Jocko appears behind him. Cora is angry. Dominic gives her a kiss; she calls out to Pedro. Jocko, unseen, pull the cord as he saw Pedro do, and the two lovers are caught in the net.)

CORA, surprised

Well, what's this all about?

DOMINIC

Ah! if my father were to come this way.

CORA

We're caught in a net


SCENE XII.

The preceding, PEDRO
 

PEDRO

Ah! Jocko, that devil, has made me run enough.

DOMINIC, to Cora

Here's father, let's be quiet. (They hold each other close)

PEDRO

I have an idea it won't be long before I catch him . . .  If I ever get my hands on that monkey . . .

DOMINIC, aside

I think he's seen me

PEDRO

I'll get my revenge the right way . . .  (Turning) Eh! Why the net is closed, might I have already caught him? Let's go see. (He carefully draws near the tree.) Heavens! Dominic and Cora!

DOMINIC

Yes, father

PEDRO

Will you get down!

DOMINIC

We cannot, we are caught in the trap

PEDRO

Well, this has been a raging success, I who wanted to keep them apart have set a net especially to bring them together . . .  But how can it have happened . . .  (Here Jocko appears at the front of the stage and makes faces at Pedro.). Ah! There you are again, you . . . Wait, just wait, I'll get you this time. (He goes and rings the bell near the house) Reinforcements are coming. (Loudly) Help me, my friends!

A number of Brazilians arrive from the right; Pedro shows them Jocko; the latter sees them, takes up the bow and Cora's arrow at the base of the tree. The Brazilians all array themselves on one side of the stage and prepare to advance on the monkey, who draws the bow and will direct his arrow at Pedro; everybody stops. Jocko nimbly get on the roof of the house on the left; the Brazilians gather around. Dominic caught up in the net, makes an effort to get down from the tamsrind tree. At that very moment, the monkey seeing himself surrounded on all sides leaps down in a series of somersaults. He heads straight for Dominic, who climbs back up into the tree. All the Brazilians appear at the back of the stage in the rice paddy, calling out. The Brazilians make a last effort to capture him, but Jocko dodges their blows. Tableau.

End of Act I


ACT II.



The theatre looks like a beautiful diorama; at stage front and mid-stage are carved stone arches. To the left one spies Jocko's hut, covered in leaves, the entrance to which is closed by dry branches. Palms, banana and date trees fill the middle of the stage. Lianas snake about attaching themselves from tree to tree. The sea occupies the full background and comes to bathe the foot of a craggy rock on the right. The events begin at five o'clock in the evening.

SCENE I.

When the curtain rises, we see Jocko atop the rock; he comes down across the stage holding a package wrapped in leaves which he carry with difficulty; he slowly approaches his hut, puts the package down on the ground, and after having drunk some coconut milk, places his paw on his cheek, showing that he is tired and is going to go to sleep; he arranges the palm leaves which are inside his little hut and lays dows. The orchestra performs soft music in keeping with Jocko's situation

SCENE II.

FERNANDEZ, dressed as a hunter; he carries a gun and a game bag

FERNANDEZ, alone, looking around

Here am I at the end of by run, nobody has seen me . . .  I will, without constraints, be able to deal with my fascinating pupil, (he calls). Jocko, Jocko! . . . He does not come . . . He cannot be far off . . . Who would have guessed that fate would use this clever animal to make me rich! . . .  Ah! if I could only discover . . .  But while I'm waiting, let me continue my journal entry (He goes and sits on a chunk of rock, draws from his pocket a large notepad, and begins to write with a pencil.)

I had long noticed that Jocko looked with particular attention at the diamond I wear on my finger. At first I believed his happiness to arise from admiring its glittering; but how surprised was I when one day, finding Jocko asleep, his body battered and bruised, as if he had rubbed himself against sharp rocks. The creature, when he awoke, presented me with two superb diamonds which he had undoubtedly discovered in one of the region's mines . . .the joy I burst out with, appeared to quickly quell his pains, but he never showed his former attachment to me. I vainly tried to find out from him where he had found these stones; but I was never able to make him understand.
However, I hope to soon achieve the goal of my studies, (he gets up, yes, I will manage to pierce this secret, and then~  Must I submit myself to such mad illusions . . .  (turning) He isn't coming . . .  If perhaps he was . . .  (he draws closer to the little hut)Ah! there he is . . .  he is sleeping, (he calls) Jocko! (Jocko wakes and upon seeing Fernandez, he gets up and runs to hug him. He kisses his hand.) He seems tired . . .  Let's try anyway. (He shows him his ring, Jocko draws back in fright). Such a sight saddens him, it must recall to him the pain and suffering he sustained in getting similar ones. (Jocko begins to gambol about) Let's let him give himself fully to his happiness. (Fernandez goes and sits down, signaling to Jocko that he is thristy. Jocko quickly climbs a coconut tree, lets a coconut drop, and climbs down from the tree by allow it to bend down to the ground, at which points he lets go it and lands on his feet; he takes a stone, breaks the coconut and comes over and offers it to Fernandez, the latter takes it and drinks.)

FERNANDEZ, pulling out a watch

Jocko, what time is it?
Jocko takes the watch at puts it to his ear, then looks attentively at the dial, retrieves a small turtle-shell drum from his hut, strikes it once with a stick, and hands the watch back to Fernandez.

FERNANDEZ

Jocko, the music& . . .
Jocko goes into his hut and brings back a small mandolin

FERNANDEZ, taking it

This is what he likes best, the sound of this instruments drives him wild with happiness.
Fernandez plays the mandolin. Jocko starts dancing, his master slows and speeds up the tempo, the monkey follows every measure.

FERNANDEZ

That's fine . . .  Now Jocko . . . (He indicates to him that he is free to go. Jocko leaps onto a liana extending between two palm trees, and performs feats of acrobatics, hangs by a foot, lets himself fall, does somersaults, etc., etc.)
(After the monkey's exercises, quick steps are heard from outside the stage)

FERNANDEZ, turning

Is that not Cora and Dominic I see, what do they want from me?


SCENE III.

The Same, CORA, DOMINIC
(As soon as he sees them, Jocko climbs up the liana to the top of a tree and disappears)
 

DOMINIC

I was pretty sure we'd find him somewhere around here . . .

CORA

Do come, Don Fernandez, people are looking everywhere for you . . .

FERNANDEZ

Has anything new occurred?

DOMINIC

A ship has just been spotted, it sails towards our coasts and under the Portuguese flag

FERNANDEZ

A Portuguese flag! ~ Great God! If it were ~ My friends, I am rushing straight home . . .  and do we know how far out the ship is?

DOMINIC

Half a league, at most

FERNANDEZ

They have no pilot, and this coast is so dangerous. I'm off to send a canoe out to it to make ensure its safe mooring. (He runs off precipatedly)

CORA

I'm coming with you (She takes a few steps)


SCENE IV.

DOMINIC, CORA

DOMINIC, holding her back

Wait a minute, you wicked girl

CORA

Leave me alone, leave me alone ~ are you going to start like this morning again?

DOMINIC

Well, you must admit you were well caught.

CORA

Yes, but the kiss, you never got it . . .

DOMINIC

Ah! If I had wanted to ~ but that damn monkey frightened me . . .  Yet, I shouldn't be frightened now, for Don Fernandez told me a story . . .

CORA

Will you tell it me?

DOMINIC

I'll tell you later . . .  you well understand, lovely Cora, that when one is close to you, one cannot think of anything else.

CORA

Well Dominic, why is it you love me?
(Clouds are seen to cover the horizon)

DOMINIC

Why don't you love me?

CORA

I've never said that

DOMINIC

But you've never said the contrary

CORA, timidly

Yes, my friendship

DOMINIC

That's worthless, it's not strong enough.

CORA

But your father.

DOMINIC

Don't listen to what he says

CORA

I am only a slave girl

DOMINIC

You're such a dear

CORA

We could never marry

DOMINIC

You never know

CORA

I would always be unhappy if I was so weak as to believe you, and share in your tenderness. A man risks nothing in being in love, but a woman . . .

DOMINIC

Come on, d-d-do you want to make me sad?

CORA, overcome with emotion

No my dear Dominic, but I would like you to be more reasonable

DOMINIC

It's impossible when you are here, near me, where I can see you . . .  touch your hand (he takes it). The fire in your eyes spreads to my very heart and does not leave it.

CORA

Dominic, stop talking to me like that . . .  You see, love begins as a game, but it ends. . .

DOMINIC

By becoming serious . . . That is what I have long felt.

CORA

Let us each go our own way

DOMINIC

Whatever for? Why, look out to the horizon . . .  Look at the clouds rolling in.

CORA

All the more reason to hurry up and get back
(Thunder is heard in the distance)

CORA, drawing closer to him

Ah! I'm petrified with fear

DOMINIC, holding her tightly in his arms

There's nothing to fear, dear little Cora, you can take shelter under one of the rocks; while we wait for the storm to pass, I can tell you the story of Jocko.

CORA

I don't want to go there with you

DOMINIC, holding her tight

What are you worried about?

CORA, naively

I don't know
(Dominique wants to take her there against her will; she is about to give in when Pedro arrives.


SCENE V.

The same, PEDRO

PEDRO, running up

Ah! sancta Maria, what do I see; they are together again

DOMINIC

Oh my God! . . .  my father!


SCENE IV.

DOMINIC, CORA

DOMINIC, holding her back

Wait a minute, you wicked girl

PEDRO, to Cora

Ah! well, an innocent little one aren't you, when you go hunting, these are the kind of parrots you try to catch.

CORA

I swear, Mr. Pedro . . .

DOMINIC

Father, it's not her fault

PEDRO

How's that?

DOMINIC

It's the storm

PEDRO

Ah! well, let's be clear about this, this morning it was the net and tonight it's the storm. Tomorrow it will be something else. I'm not going to listen to this nonsense any more, I don't want to see you together. (to Cora) And if you have the misfortune of loving my son, you'll have to deal with me . . .

DOMINIC

God! How tiresome it is to hear the same story over and over again.

PEDRO

It's not that, it's not that.
He catches up with them, separates them and takes his place between them, giving one arm to each; they exit after having gone around the stage.


SCENE VI.

JOCKO reappears

One hears the sound of squalls coming from the sea; the powerful wind whistles. Jocko rubs his head with his paw to wipe the raindrops from it. The storm intensifies, Jocko runs off to avoid it, runs around the stage, goes in his hut, picks up the branch of a banana tree to make an umbrella, but the powerful wind breaks the branch and it flies off. Jocko no longer knowing where to put himself screeches and climbs up a palm tree. There, one sees a number of small monkeys, frightened by the storm; they put on faces and begin jumping about. Several climb up the coconut trees to pick the fruit, which they toss to those on the ground. The latter catch them, break them and suck out the milk. Jocko participates in their games. The storm gets worse. On the horizon one sees a ship battered by the storm. Soon one hears a lot of noise from offstage. All the little monkeys gather in a group off to the right, and turning to the left, throw all their coconuts in the same direction, then run away with high pitched cries. A few Brazilians come running on stage, looking out to sea towards the ship. An alrm bell is heard in the distance. Pedro and Dominic, followed by a large number of Brazilians quickly cross the stage, calling out: swim out! swim out! at the same time there is a great clap of thunder, the ship strikes a rock and sinks into the sea. Tableau! -- They all ready themselves to save the the victims of the shipwreck. Dominic and several Creoles who had swum out to sea soon reappear, they are carrying an unconscious woman, people gather around them.

PEDRO, excitedly

.
Friends, take her to the house quickly, make sure she gets all the care she needs, there is still time, go!

All the Brazilians leave stage right. Pedro follows them sadly. The storm begins to dissipate. Jocko reappears, he paces about the stage with a worried expression. One sees on the sea a child attached to a bowsprit still wrapped inside the head sails; the waves threaten to swallow him up, when Jocko sees him, rushes out on the rock to the left and is able by hanging over the turbulent waters to save the young victim. He moves upstage holding the child, places it on a bed of grass, and offers him some bananas, believing him to be hungry, then he presents him with a coconut, but seeing that the child does not say anything, he places him in his hut on some leaves, wrapping him up in a thousand ways, with anything he can find. Letting him sleep, he watches over him.


SCENE VII.

PEDRO, DOMINIC, CORA

PEDRO, almost speechless

Ah! my dear Dominic, what an event! You, my poor son, who almost perished swimming to save the poor woman.

DOMINIC

Let us not speak of me, father, I only did my duty . . . but does anyone suspect who this woman is?

PEDRO

Alas, none suspect, rather all know that it is our dear master's wife . . .  the ship was recognized, he has learned the full extent of his misfortune, and while he send out a pilot one way, the vessel ran aground here.

DOMINIC

He has lost everything!

PEDRO

Everything! his son, his fortune . . .

DOMINIC

But at this point what can we do, Mr. Pedro?

PEDRO

I have no idea . . . lets run and find out the latest news . . . I don't have the strength to witness my dear master's sorrow.


SCENE VIII.

The preceding, A BRAZILIAN, TWO SAILORS

THE BRAZILIAN

Here, Mr. Pedro, we bring you another two of the crew's brave sailors. They jumped into the sea to save our good master's child; they claim to have seen him from a distance and that he came to rest on this shore.

PEDRO

Can it be possible? O! my dear friends, let us all run, and search& . . . If it were true I would die of happiness . . . But here is a gun. (Picking up the gun which Fernandez had left near the rock.) It is our master's; here take it (He hands it to a sailor) This place is crawling with dangerous animals, we must be alert. (They run offstage


SCENE IX.

The child awakens, saying: Mother, it hurts; Jocko hearing him speak comes to have a look at him and wants to take his hand; the child gets up and escapes across the stage, crying out: Ah! the vile beast. (Jocko runs after him)

THE CHILD, crying

Ah! Don't hurt me! (Jocko makes as to cuddle him)

THE CHILD

Don't you want to eat me?
     Jocko makes some funny faces at him

THE CHILD, getting on his knees and putting his hands together

Tell me where my mother is.
Jocko imitates him, getting on his knees and putting his hands together like him.

THE CHILD

Well, say something!   (Jocko caresses him)

THE CHILD, somewhat reassured

Well, it's a monkey like the one we had in Lisbon, he isn't wicked, ah! so much the better!
He gets up and takes the monkey's paw in his hand. Jocko makes a few faces. The child, delighted, plays with Jocko.

Here a huge snake crosses the stage along the seashore; Jocko sees it and becomes concerned, the child cries out: Save me, save me. The snake approaches. Jocko who sees it drawing near the child, understand the danger he is exposed to, picks him up in his arms and runs off with him; the snake follows them and disappears towards the large rock.


SCENE X.

FERNANDEZ, DOMINIC, CORA, Brazilians
They enter from the opposite side

FERNANDEZ, to Dominic and Cora

My friends, my dear friends, I thank you for your kind attentions . . . My spouse has escaped death and has recovered, and it is you, Dominic, you who saved her: ah! will my heart ever be able to repay you for this good deed~  Come, let me hold you in my arms once again.

DOMINIC

My dear master!

FERNANDEZ

I would have hoped for everyone here to receive a reward for their courage and intrepidity, but how could I offer one worthy of you. My entire fortune is lost beneath the waves, and my beloved son has died along with it. I will never see my son again!  (He cries) My life will wither away in memories and regrets! I have no future, no consolations!

DOMINIC

Don't let yourself be dragged down with sadness~  you are surrounded with faithful servants; we'll all work together, and that fortune you wish you had back.

FERNANDEZ
.
Ah! my friends, nothing can give me back my dear son, and his mother, barely returned from the threshold of the tomb . . . she does not yet know of this crushing disaster . . . may she not know of it for a long time . . .  Alas! were she to learn of it, I would lose both of them at once,

At this moment one sees Jocko appear in the background, still holding little Fernand and looking around everywhere in fear.


SCENE XI.

The Preceding, PEDRO, BRAZILIANS (male and female), SAILORS

FERNANDEZ, and several voices in the wings

We've got him, we've got him.
Pedro and several sailors enter running. One of the latter aims at Jocko, the bullet crosses the theatre and strikes the monkey, which lets out a frightful cry.

FERNANDEZ


What's that noise?

THE CHILD, whom the monkey has left when shot, comes up to Fernandez and cries out.


Ah! it's my daddy!

FERNANDEZ


My God! What do I see? Could it be true~ my son!

DOMINIC


His son!

FERNANDEZ, with delirious joy


Non, there's no error . . .  my heart cannot stand it~ Ah! my dear son. (He kisses him several times). But tell me, my friend, how did you get here?

THE CHILD


I have no idea, I was on the ship, I fell in the sea.

FERNANDEZ


WHo saved you?

THE CHILD


I don't remember; I slept for a long time and when I woke up, I saw a monkey; he was not wicked, and we played together; later a big snake came along, and the monkey took me away, fearing it would do me harm.

FERNANDEZ


Ah! I think I can guess! But what was the sound we just heard?

PEDRO


It was a sailor firing on Jocko who was kidnapping your son

FERNANDEZ


The Jocko! . . . Good God, if it were the one . . . !

THE CHILD

Come and see how they've hurt him, it makes me very sad.

Jocko who has gathered enough strength to go to his hut, where with the greatest difficulty he picked up the diamonds he had brought that morning, dragged himself painfully back close to Fernandez, and throws them at his feet.

FERNANDEZ


Ah! Heavens! . . . what a discovery; it is to him I owe my son and my fortune, and the poor wretch for all his services . . . My friends, let us not abandon him, we may still be able to save him . . . (He bends over towards Jocko, who turns and gives his master one last glance. With emotion.) Ah! he dies!

Everyone gathers around the inanimate body

A bust of tam-tams

The curtain drops

THE END


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