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Volume 0875
Presents
Amazing:  July 15, 1927 Annual - Master Mind of Mars ~ Frank R. Paul cover art
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THE MASTER MIND OF MARS
GALLERY OF ART FROM
AMAZING STORIES MAGAZINE
ILLUSTRATIONS BY FRANK R. PAUL
"The Dean of Scientifiction Illustrators"


"Edgar Rice Burroughs has written many interesting stories, but we believe, for downright originality and exciting interest, "The Master Mind of Mars" is hard to equal.  There is hardly a page that does not hold your interest.  Once the story gets under way, hair-raising episodes seem to tumble right over each other -- they come so quickly.

Besides this, the science is excellent and no matter how strangely the tale reads, it always, somehow or other, seems to have an element of truth in it."

"If you are a Burroughs fan -- and you probably are -- this new story by the well-known author will not fail to impress and stir you to the roots.  Here is another of his Martian stories, entirely new, packed chockful of adventure and excellent science.  In this theme, Burroughs has hit upon a new idea, which he exploits throughout the story in a truly masterful and expert manner. Nor is your interest allowed to lag for a single paragraph, for Edgar Rice Burroughs knows how to keep you guessing.  You will not rest easy until you have finished reading the story.  It is one of this favorite author's best."

~ Hugo Gernsback - 1927

Then he lay a hand upon one of his two swords, but as he drew the weapon, I leaped to my feet, and with such remarkable results that I cannot even now say which was the more surprised, he or I.  I must have sailed ten feet into the air and back about twenty feet from where I had been sitting.  Then I was indeed sure that I was upon Mars (not that I had for one instant doubted it.)  There could be now doubt of it -- I stood upon the soil of The Red Planet -- I had come to the world of my dreams -- to Barsoom.


. . .  and then she returned the fourth time to the table which bore the figure of the most beautiful creature
I had ever looked upon, and stood looking long and earnestly into the dead face . . . .
then she indicated the body with a gesture and nodded assent to the withered keeper of this ghostly exhibit.
 


"We will not harm you," said Ras Thavas.
The man attempted to reply, but his words were unintelligible gibberish;
then he shook his head and growled.
Ras Thavas took a step toward him and the man dropped to all fours,
his knuckles resting on the floor, and backed away.


"That does not interest me. Quick! Reach a decision.
In five tals I shall press this button.
If you promise what I ask, you shall be restored with a new and beautiful body -- if you refuse,
you shall lie here in the semblance of death forever."


"And you?" I asked, turning to Dar Tarus as I released the bonds that held Gor Hajus.
For the first time I now noticed that the ugly expression
that I had first noted upon the face of Dar Tarus had given place to one of eagerness.
"Strike off my bonds," he said, "and I will follow you to the ends of Barsoom!"


Several feet below us lay spread the broad, well lighted avenues of Toonol. . .
Here and there a building was raised high upon its supporting cylindrical metal shaft.
Where the residences predominated, the city took on the appearance of a colossal and grotesque forest.


"Let me see your night flying permit and your flier's license,"
ordered the one above us, at the same time swooping  suddenly to our level and
giving me my first sight of a Martian policeman.
He was equipped with a much swifter and handier equilibrimotor than ours.
He demanded permit and license again and flashed a light in the face of my friend.
Instantly he voiced an exclamation of surprise and satisfaction.


. . . If I were the more agile jumper, Hovan Du far outclassed me in climbing,
with the result that he reached the rail and was clambering over
while my eyes were still below the level of the deck.


"I go," he cried, "but let harm befall my friends and I shall return and tear the heart from Xaxa.
Tell her that from the Great Ape of Ptarth."
. . . Every eye was upon Hovan Du as he stood there with the struggling figure of Sag Or in his mighty grasp.


I think the effect of the awful silence in the presence of the living god was more impressive than would words have been.
The two priests simply collapsed.
They slid to the floor and lay there trembling, moaning and supplicating Tur to have mercy on them.
Nor did they rise before the first worshippers arrived.


Volume 0875

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