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presents
Volume 2116
See Part I at ERBzine 2115
GAYLORD DUBOIS

Writer of over 350 Tarzan Stories
King of the Comics Writers
.

Gaylord DuBois
.

Gaylord and Mary DuBois
Gaylord McIlvaine Du Bois ("dooBOYZ") (August 24, 1899 - October 20, 1993) was an amazingly prolific writer who, throughout his long 40-year career, wrote over 3,000 stories. Between 1948 and 1972 he would write over 350 Tarzan stories as well as Korak stories for that series' run of 45 issues. DuBois probably wrote more Tarzan stories than any other author.

In 1948 he was assigned by Western Publishing Co. to write Tarzan stories for Dell comics. Tarzan had been a popular daily and Sunday comic strip since 1928 -- featuring the work of Rex Maxon, Hal Foster and Burne Hogarth. There had been numerous Tarzan comic books (Tip Top, Sparkler, Funnies, etc.) stretching back almost 20 years, but they had all been reprints of the comic strips -- the Dell series (later Gold Key) would feature original stories by Gaylord DuBois with art by Jesse Mace Marsh. Their first collaboration for Dell was 4-Color #134 (February 1947) -- Tarzan and the Devil Ogre -- and the success of this issue led to the follow-up 4-Color #161 (August 1947) -- Tarzan and the Fires of Tohr -- and then to issue #1 (Jan-Feb 1948) of the Tarzan comic series.


READ THEM HERE
ERBzine 2397: Dell 4-Colour Tarzan 134: Devil Ogre
ERBzine 2397: Dell 4-Colour Tarzan 161: Fires of Tohr
ERBzine 2401: Dell No. 1:  White Savages of Vari

Tarzan and the Fires of Tohr #161 ~1947 Dell ComicDell #1

Read his Dell Tarzan and John Carter Stories:
www.erbzine.com/mag23/2395.html

Read his Gold Key Tarzan Stories:
www.erbzine.com/mag25/2596.html





Jesse Mace Marsh worked for Disney Studios from 1939 to 1948 working on projects such as Pinocchio and Fantasia. His first work for Western Publishing appeared in 1945 and he worked as staff artist for them until his death in 1966. He produced an amazing body of work in addition to his work on the Tarzan series: Gene Autry, Daniel Boone, Davy Crockett and many more. He also drew three issues of John Carter of Mars in the 4-Color series - these issues were also reprinted in the mid-60s.

Postal regulations dictated that comics contain features in addition to the main book title so DuBois contributed series such as "Mabu", "Two Against the Jungle" and "Boy". Issue number 25 in October 1951 saw the debut of the popular series "Brothers of the Spear", which would run for over 25 years and which, in issue 39, would feature the first professional work of brilliant artist Russ Manning.  Manning eventually took over the Tarzan series in November 1965 following Marsh's retirement. The first "Brothers of the Spear" episode occupied a mere six pages, but it launched a serialized story that eventually grew to epic proportions.
 
 


The heroes were white and black kings, Dan-El and Natongo, whose thrones had been usurped. Over the years DuBois led them through spectactular adventures and eventually they both regained their kingdoms and married beautiful women, Tavane and Zulena. The final original story appeared in #202 (August, 1971), still written by DuBois, but drawn by Manning's assistant, Mike Royer. Another Manning assistant, Bill Stout, tried to develop it as a newspaper comic strip but the project was unsuccessful.

Gaylord DuBois drew many of his plot ideas from the original Tarzan novels and from the same African reference books that had inspired Burroughs -- H. M. Stanley's In Darkest Africa, Buel's Heroes of the Dark Continent, and H. Rider Haggard's novels (see the Burroughs Library Project). There was evidence of the Burroughs influence in the two debut 4-Color issues and the first issue of Tarzan drew somewhat from Tarzan the Magnificent.

But he was also directed by the Dell editors to bring in elements from the screen interpretations and the newspaper strip character and to tone down violence after the comics code was introduced. Although generally quite faithful to the ERB novels, the DuBois Tarzans contained many extensions of the original stories as well as obvious departures. The screen influence became evident by issue three:

  • Tarzan was no longer the cultured and articulate British nobleman
  • Tarzan's wife Jane was a brunette
  • Their son was called Boy
  • They lived in a treehouse
  • Tarzan moved throught rainforest/jungle by swinging on vines
  • The principal Dell Tarzan artist from 1947 through 1963/5 was Jesse Marsh. Their collaboration turned out to be one of the most prolific and creative in comic history and added considerably to the Tarzan legend.  In Dell issue #20 (March-April 1951) they mapped their own Jungle World which had only limited references to the map created by Burroughs.

    In addition to using many of ERB's ape language words, DuBois made up some of his own as well as adding words from French, Latin, Bantu and Arabic languages. He used many of the animals, people and places mentioned in the ERB books but added many of his own including:

  • Buto Matari the giant native chief
  • Dr. MacWhirtle, the eccentric trouble-prone professor
  • Goliath - a giant lion
  • Argus and Aguila the giant eagles
  • Giant otters
  • Prehistoric beasts and savage men
  • Talking gorillas
  • Arab sheiks and shiftas
  • A long string of missionaries, explorers, beautiful girls in danger, scientists, villains, fliers, etc.
  • Many lost tribes and lost lands
  • When Manning took over as the Gold Key Tarzan artist, DuBois started to adapt the original ERB stories, beginning in December 1965 with Tarzan of the Apes and ending 20 titles later with Tarzan and the Lion Man. The Manning/DuBois team's "authentic, authorized adaptations of the original Tarzan novels" were a remarkable success. DuBois was so successful in condensing each of the first four novels into 24 pages that starting with Tarzan and the Jewels of Opar he was allowed to spread many of each of the next 16 adaptations across three issues and 72 pages.

    Manning's long years as a Marsh understudy and experience in other genres made for a smooth and exciting art style. His depictions of the ape man were so popular that in December 1967 ERB, Inc. signed him to do the daily Tarzan strips and and later the colour Sunday pages for newspaper syndication. Artists Gray Morrow, Paul Norris, Mike Royer, Doug Wildey and Warren Tufts were all commissioned to work as Tarzan and Korak artists for the Dell/Gold Key comics from October 1969 through February 1972. In all, the Tarzan comic book series ran for 206 issues and DuBois also wrote the scripts for many annuals, digests and special projects such as the 19 issues of "March of Comics".

    After the Tarzan comics were taken over by DC and Marvel (a total of 82 issues), DuBois was assigned other projects by Gold Key. "Brothers of the Spear" was not a property of Edgar Rice Burroughs, Inc. so DuBois expanded it into its own comic series. He was also commissioned to create "Tono and Kono, the Jungle Twins."

    He retired at age 76, which gave him more time to pursue is interest in Christianity and to spend more time with his beloved wife, Mary, his longtime assistant and script typist. He made one return to comics script writing in 1989 when he worked on "Bukki, Warrior of Ancient Israel" for Aida-Zee Comics. The "King of the Comics Writers" died in October 1993 at his home in Orange City, Florida and his wife, Mary, died soon after.

    Gaylord DuBois had little recognition during his long writing career as his name did not appear on his work. He should be remembered, however, as one of the major contributors to the Tarzan legend and he kept the spirit of Edgar Rice Burroughs alive for 24 years.

    ERBzine Comic Encyclopedia
    .
    Tarzan Comics Summaries
    by Duane Adams
    Dell Overview ~ All Titles
    .
    1529 Dell Tarzan 4-Colour 1947
    0659 Fires of Tohr comic / OTR
    1551 Dell Tarzan Kill Tally
    ..0850 Dell #1 Comparative Study
    0851 Dell Comics 1-10 Summaries
    0852 Dell Comics 11-20 Summaries
    1478 Tarzan Dells: 21-30
    1552 Dell Tarzan Summaries 31-40
    1553 Dell Tarzan Summaries 41-50
    1569 Dell Tarzan Summaries 51-60
    1571 Dell Tarzan Summaries 61-70
    1572 Dell Tarzan Summaries 71-80
    1573 Dell Tarzan Summaries 81-90
    1574 Dell Tarzan Summaries 91-100
    1575 Dell Tarzan Summaries 101-110
    1576 Dell Tarzan Summaries 111-120
    1577 Tarzan Summaries 121-131
    1566 Dell Tarzan Annuals 1-3.
    1567 Dell Tarzan Annuals 4-7
    1596 Dell Tarzan Annuals  8-10
    1597 Dell Language Banks
    1595 Dell Places: A-F | G-L | M-R | S-Z
    1598 Dell Things: A-E |F-L | M-R | S-Z
    1690 Dell People/Animals A-Z


     
     

    A PARTIAL GAYLORD DUBOIS BIBLIOGRAPHY
    COMIC BOOK TITLES FOR DELL/GOLD KEY

    Tarzan
    Korak
    Brothers of the Spear
    The Lone Ranger
    Space Family Robinson
    Tono and Kono, the Jungle Twins
    Turok, Son of Stone
    The Rebel
    Bat Masterson
    Lassie
    Tales of Wells Fargo
    Bonanza
    Hi Yo Silver
    National Velvet
    Gulliver's Travels
    A Treasure of Dogs
    Lost in Space
    Roy Rogers
    Uncle Wiggily
    Red Ryder
    Tom and Jerry
    Raggedy Ann
    Gene Autry
    Zane Grey's King of the Royal Mounted 
    Sergeant Preston of the Yukon
    Wanted: Dead Or Alive
    Bonanza 
    Zane Grey's Stories of the West
    Roy Rogers' Trigger
    Gene Autry's Champion
    The Chief
    Andy Panda
    Our Gang
    Uncle Wiggily
    Jungle Twins
    Dell Junior Treasury
    Santa Claus Funnies
    Frosty the Snowman
    Walt Scott's Little People
    The Littlest Snowman
    Jungle Jim
    Abraham Lincoln
    Moses and the Ten Commandments
    MOVIE & TV ADAPTATIONS BOOKS & BLBs
    Robin Hood (Disney-Movie) 
    Quentin Durward
    The Animal World 
    Around the World in 80 Days 
    The Story of Mankind
    Seventh Voyage of Sinbad 
    Last Train from Gun Hill
    The Horse Soldiers
    Solomon and Sheba
    Spartacus
    Kidnapped
    The Story of Ruth
    North to Alaska
    Master of the World
    Dondi
    Pepe 
    Lord Jim
    Marlin Perkins Zoo Parade
    Lowell Thomas' High Adventure
    Tom Sawyer
    Huckleberry Finn
    Little Women
    Kidnapped
    The Pony Express,
    Nomads of the North
    The Lone Ranger 1936 ~ first title by Gaylor DuBois (the next 17 titles were by Fran Striker)
    Barry Blake of the Flying Fortress 1943
    Rex, king of the deep
    Rex, King of the Deep ~ Grosset & Dunlap, 1941
    The Hurricane Kids on the Lost Islands ~ 1941~  by Oskar Lebeck and Gaylord Dubois.
    The Long Rider
    Barry Blake of the Flying Fortress
    The Pony Express
    Rex, King of the Deep
    Stratosphere Jim
    Clyde Beatty
    Don Winslow of the Navy
    Tarzan the Untamed. 96 pages. Dark Horse Reprint
    Tarzan in The Land That Time Forgot. 96 Dark Horse Reprint
    Gaylord DuBois wrote for the 

    Little Blue Books series. Titles included:
    Simple Recipes for Home Cooking #997 -- 1926 
    (published while attending university in Boston)
    Pocket Dictionary, Spanish-English, English-Spanish #1105 -- 1927
    Spanish Self Taught #1109 --1927
    French Self-Taught #1207 -- 1927
    Easy Readings in Spanish #1222 -- 1927
    Visits among the Mormons #1270 (partial) -- 1928
    MORE BIG & BETTER LITTLE BOOK TITLES
    TAILSPIN TOMMY Series of Big and Better Little Books: 
    Author: Hal Forrest (pseudonym for Gaylord DuBois).  Artist: Hal Forest
    TAILSPIN TOMMY IN THE FAMOUS PAY-ROLL MYSTERY 1933 First Tailspin Tommy
    TAILSPIN TOMMY THE DIRIGIBLE FLIGHT TO THE NORTH POLE 1934
    TAILSPIN TOMMY THE DIRIGIBLE FLIGHT TO THE NORTH POLE  1934
    TAILSPIN TOMMY HUNTING FOR PIRATE GOLD  1935
    TAILSPIN TOMMY AND THE ISLAND IN THE SKY 1936
    TAILSPIN TOMMY AND THE HOODED FLYER 1937
    TAILSPIN TOMMY AND THE SKY BANDITS  1938
    TAILSPIN TOMMY IN THE GREAT AIR MYSTERY (starring Noah Berry) 1938 Possibly by Gaylord DuBois
    -- adapted from screenplay by George Plympton and others.  Contains 104 photographs from the Universal picture.
    TAILSPIN TOMMY AND THE LOST TRANSPORT  1940
    TAILSPIN TOMMY, THE WEASEL, AND HIS SKYWAYMAN  1941 
    TOM MIX IN THE RANGE WAR 1937 by Buck Wilson (pseudonym for Gaylord DuBois).  Artist: Hal Arbo.

    TOM MIX IN THE RIDING AVENGER 1936 Dell  by Buck Wilson (pseudonym for Gaylord DuBois) Artist: Hal Arbo
    ROY ROGERS AND THE DEADLY TREASURE  1937 by Gaylord Du Bois ~ Artist: Jesse Marsh
    BUCK JONES AND THE TWO GUN KID 1937 by Gaylord DuBois
    TIM MCCOY AND THE SANDY GULCH STAMPEDE 1939 by Gaylord DuBois.  Artist: Unknown.
    TIM MCCOY ON THE TOMAHAWK TRAIL 1937 by Gaylord DuBois  Artist: Robert R. Weisman
    OTHER
    "Gaylord DuBois: King of the Comics Writers" by Irvin H. Ziemann ~ Comics Buyer's Guide, chapters starting in no. 829


    COVER GALLERY









    See Part I at ERBzine 2115
    From

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    ERBzine Weekly Webzine



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