Erbzine.com Homepage
Official Edgar Rice Burroughs Tribute and Weekly Webzine Site
Since 1996 ~ Over 10,000 Web Pages in Archive
Volume 1693
R.E. Prindle Presents
Horning Into Africa
by
W. S. Van Dyke ~ 1931


Click photos for full-screen images

INTRODUCTION ~ LOOKING BACK - PREPARATIONS FOR THE TRIP


Colonel W. S. Van Dyke


An Arab Dhow off the African Coast, Loaded to the Gunnel with Vermin and Smells.
These little ships often traverse two or three thousand miles of ocean.


With "Mike" and Camera in The Heart of Uganda.
This picture is reproduced for the simple reason it is about the only time on record
anyone ever caught me with my back to the camera.


CHAPTER I: AMAZING SAFARI


A Native Village of Kukuas on the Banks of the Thika River in North Kenya.
They are more picturesque and less odoriferous looking at them from a distance.
And it is somewhat safer, to keep the distance.


CHAPTER II: WHAT A TRIP -- AND HOW


African Swamp Land -- evil looking and evil smelling.
One moment ou are on firm ground and with the next step, you could go out of sight in the "goo."
Full of reptilian and germ life and not recommended for constitutionals.


Ju-ju and Witchcraft. Interior of a Medicine Man's hut way up among the Alunas.
Cannibalism is not practiced, or if at all, it is in secret,
as the governments have inconsiderately denied them this playful little pastime.


CHAPTER III: AFRICA OR BUST -- OR BOTH


High Types of Kukua Women.
Their dazzling beauty is not so valuable in Africa as their strong backs.
The one on the right is worth only three goats.


CHAPTER IV: AFRICA AND BUSTED


My Actors Learned To Climb Trees and Climb Fast in Africa.
These are real African elephants and a lot closer to the camera than I was.


CHAPTER V: CIVILIZATION BEGINS TO FADE


What Elephants Look Like When They're Coming.
It is moments like this when the elephant gun shrinks to about the size of a cap pistol, and you long for nothing quite so much as a tank.
Probably one of the greatest thrills in Africa is to be in the tall grass with one of these fellows and have him slightly disconcerted.


Unloading from a River Boat at Rhino Camp.
And reloading to trucks on the shores of the White Nile. From here we went into the Congo.
The Clothing most of the natives wore in this district would have made Eve look dressed up.


Nice, Pearly, White Teeth
that need very little cleaning by the birds, but the nest of leeches, which you can see in the lower jaw,
often affords a hearty repast for the plover.


CHAPTER VI: AFRICA -- SAVAGE AT LAST


Top of murchison Falls
Where the entire waters of the Victoria Nile flow into a gap fifteen feet wide with a two hundred foot drop.
Incidentally makes the noice of the discharge of a big naval gun sound like a dud blast of a seidlitz powder.


CHAPTER VII: I BECOME A HERO


Early Morning After a Night of Flood.
Some of the tents are still standing due to huge trenches
we had dug around them somewhat after the manner of a Flanders' battlefield.


CHAPTER VIII: WHY I DISLIKE CROCS


Harry Carey, Who Nearly Lost His Foot Trying to Kid the Crocodiles,
and a couple of them are nearly laughing themselves to death.
Just a little recreation to highlight the day's toil.


CHAPTER IX OUR FIRST NATIVE TROUBLE


This One Got Obstreperous.
Of all the animals in Africa, the lion is possibly the easiest to hunt and kill.
One party of Americans killed fifty-six lions in three weeks -- wanton slaughter of a noble beast,
who probably has more mercy in his heart than the humans who hunt him.


CHAPTER X: THE FIRST LION


A Triumphant Engineering Feat.
An elevator to raise our cameras above the level of the elephant grass,
when we got the elephants where we wanted them.
The reason the writer is not in this picture is that the elephants were coming at the moment.


CHAPTER XI: ON INTO THE CONGO


Edwina Looks Pleasant Here, But She's Not.
At this moment she is suffering from (name the disease yourself) and asphyxiation.
Her blonde hair was ever a source of wonder and delight to the pygmies.
The Chief seated in the foreground is the proud possessor of several cubes of salt
-- a mark of affluence and power in the Congo.


Harey Carey, Edwina Booth, Duncan Renaldo and Mutia Oomooloo and the body of a topi.
Standing over the body of a topi from which they had just driven three lions.
They go on with the scene whiel the three lions sit not far off and wonder what foolishness this is
. . . It was.


CHAPTER XII: MORE NATIVE TROUBLE


One of Our Little Pet Playmates and a Few of His Wives.
He did very well by himself.
I was never sure whether or not all the people standing behind him were his children.
And I don't think he knew.


CHAPTER XIII: SERENGETI PLAINS


Iscari, The King's Crack African Rifles
and there is no better fighting force in the world nor more loyal.
In times of peace they act as Africa's Royal North West Mounted Police with just as fine a reputation.
Their only mounts are shanks' mares.


This Poor Fellow Died Hard
and gave us a few very unpleasant moments.
I expected to get a large block of stock from the Lucky Strike people when I sent them this picture.
They mailed me six packages.


CHAPTER XIV: CAMP ON THE DUMA


At the Top of the Thika Falls.
Another African torrent which represents enough power to light all of Kenya Colony.
It is a pity this picture was not taken in color.
There were several rainbows holding petting parties in the spray.


CHAPTER XV: M. G. M. GOES HUNTING
CHAPTER XVI: GAME STORIES TRUE AND OTHERWISE


A Beau Brummel of the Masai.
Hair plaited with blood, mud, and cowdung. Earrings of iron and copper.
Spear of malleable iron which he himself smelts from the ore.
One of the finest and most fearless fighting men in this or anybody else's land.


CHAPTER XVII: MODUS OPERANDI


Nursing a Sore Jaw After Trying to Steal Harry Carey's Last Can of Tobacco.
If I remember rightly, this picture was taken just after I had accidentally bumped myj aw
against Harry Carey's fist while stealing his last can of tobacco.


Dickinson, Myself, and One of the Enemy
at about the time when the little red bug was found.
Note the parrot-like mouth of the rhino.


CHAPTER XVIII: STOPPED AT LAST


Kukua Warriors In All Their Finery, and Mean As They Make 'em.
Notice the cute little native black jack in the hand of the one on the left,
and he'd love to use it on anything, black or white.


CHAPTER XIX: THE BEGINNING OF THE END


Kukua Royalty, Father and Son, with Ju-ju Stick and Amulets.
The vestment of the young lad is of kongoni hide soaked in oil,
while the old lad has a good-sized piece of cloth bought from the Dukor Store.
In such habiliments they feel far more dressed up than a grenadier.


Mutia, Never Did Know What It Was All About.
He just did what the crazy white man told him to do and nearly stole the picture.


CHAPTER XX: WE EVACUATE

Horning Into Africa is one of the 1,100 books described in the
PERSONAL LIBRARY OF EDGAR RICE BURROUGHS PROJECT
www.ERBzine.com/dan
The book is featured on Library Shelf UV with the following entry:

W. S. "Woody" Van Dyke  1889 - 1943 ~ Woodbridge Strong Van Dyke
Horning Into Africa ~ 1931 ~ Los Angeles, Van Dyke/California Graphic ~ photographic frontispiece and 26 other photographic plates ~ 219pp ~  Privately printed telling of the story of the filming of Trader Horn ~ The book chronicles the MGM company led by Van Dyke that went on location to Africa to film  Trader Horn in 1930. Van Dyke went on to direct Tarzan the Ape Man (1932) ~ "Detailing the adventures revolving around the filming of Trader Horn near Lake Victoria. There are episodes of hunting buffalo, Lion, and rhinoceros with professional hunter W.V.D. Dickinson. The stars of the film, Harry Carey, Edwina Booth, and Duncan Rinaldo, appear in one staged photograph after having driven off a lion feeding on the carcass of a topi."
Filmography
Josephine Chippo connection with Van Dyke
Woodbridge Strong Van Dyke II: Before entering the movie business, Van Dyke was a gold miner, a lumberjack, a railroad worker and a mercenary. Born March 21, 1889 San Diego, CA - February 5, 1943 Brentwood, CA  (suicide) 
He  inaugurated his career at age three as a stage actor, in the company of his widowed actress-mother. When acting jobs were scarce, young Van Dyke worked as a miner, electrician and (allegedly) a soldier-for-hire in Mexico during the 'teens. In 1916, he was hired as one of several assistants to director D.W. Griffith, working in this capacity on Griffith's mammoth Intolerance. After assisting director James Young at Paramount, Van Dyke was allowed to direct his first solo film in 1917. He spent most of the 1920s laboring on quickie Westerns, earning a reputation for speed and efficiency. In 1928, he was brought into MGM's troubled production White Shadows on the South Seas, which, under the snail's-pace direction of Robert J. Flaherty (a brilliant documentary maker whose skills at fictional filmmaking was slight), was running way behind schedule. When White Shadows opened to critical and audience approval, Van Dyke was elevated to Hollywood's A-list of directors, though even when handed huge budgets and big stars he never altered his rush-it-through directorial technique (the one exception to this was his year-long sojourn on Trader Horn [1931]). "One Take Woody" was often derided by his fellow MGM directors, who bemoaned Van Dyke's "carelessness" and "sloppiness." However, Van Dyke's best films -- The Thin Man (1934), San Francisco (1936), It's a Wonderful World (1939) -- hold up far better than the works of many of his more art-conscious colleagues. A favorite of no-nonsense leading men like Clark Gable and William Powell, Van Dyke was not held in as high esteem by certain actresses accustomed to being fussed over for hours before stepping in front of the cameras; still, he got along quite well with the temparamental Norma Shearer when he took over direction of the troubled Shearer epic Marie Antoinette (1938). Working at MGM until 1942, the year before his death, Van Dyke could take pride in the fact that virtually all his films made money for the studio -- and virtually none went over budget. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide

  .
Woody Van Dyke                      .                  Edwina Booth

 
.ERBzine Silver Screen: All the ERB Films
www.ERBzine.com/movies



TRADER HORN - THE MOVIE ~ 1931
Credits from the Internet Movie Data Base Site
Taglines: WHITE GODDESS OF THE PAGAN TRIBES. THE CRUELEST WOMAN IN ALL AFRICA !
                 THE MOST EXCITING ADVENTURE FROM M-G-M's HALL OF FAME!
Director:  W.S. Van Dyke
Producer: Irving Thalberg  (uncredited) 
Writing credits: Ethelreda Lewis (book) ~ Dale Van Every (adaptation) ~ Alfred Aloysius Horn   (book) uncredited and 
Ethelreda Lewis (book) ~ Dale Van Every (adaptation) ~ John T. Neville (adaptation) ~ Richard Schayer (screenplay) ~ Cyril Hume   (dialogue) 

Plot Summary: While on safari in an unexplored area of Africa, Trader Horn and Peru find missionary Edith Trent killed by natives. They decide to carry on her quest for her lost daughter Nina. They find her as the queen of a particularly savage tribe, and try to bring her back to civilization. Runtime: 122 min 

Cast
 Harry Carey ....  Aloysius 'Trader' Horn 
 Edwina Booth ....  Nina Trent, the White Godess 
 Duncan Renaldo ....  Peru 
 Mutia Omoolu ....  Rencharo, Horn's Gun Bearer 
 Olive Carey ....  Edith Trent (as Olive Golden) 
 Bob Kortman ....  (scenes deleted) 
 Marjorie Rambeau ....  Edith Trent (scenes deleted) 
 C. Aubrey Smith ....  St. Clair, a Trader (uncredited) 
 Riano Tindama ....  Witch Doctor (uncredited) 

Trivia: When Africans Mutia Omoolu and Riano Tindama were brought to Hollywood for re-shoots, they were refused admission to the Hollywood Hotel because they were black. (more) 

User Comments: Author: Mike Resnick from Cincinnati, Ohio
The first full-length movie ever filmed on location, this African adventure features exceptional wildlife footage, and a nice acting job by Harry Carey. True, it's an antique -- but it's a wonderful, exciting, beautifully-photographed antique, with a wonderful use of the language. More User Comments

Awards: Nominated for Best Picture Oscar 1931. 
 

Horning into Africa is referenced by R. E. Prindle his series:
Themes And Variations: The Tarzan Novels Of Edgar Rice Burroughs
Tarzan and the Leopard Men by Edgar Rice Burroughs

Part I:
Intro & Trader Horn
.
Part II: 
Debunking the Debunkers
.
Part III:
This Silent River 
Of Mystery And Death
Part IV:
Cast of Characters
.
Part V:
How the Story
Is Told
Part VI:
Edgar Rice Burroughs
In His Milieu
Horning Into Africa
W. S. Van Dyke
A Photo Gallery
A Guide to the 
Articles of
R. E. Prindle
Plus
Themes And Variations by R. E. Prindle
The Tarzan Novels Of Edgar Rice Burroughs
#18: Tarzan and the Lion Man by R. E. Prindle
Part 1: 
Introduction
Part 2: 
Doubles And Insanity
Part 3: 
The Source
Part 4: Safari To The 
Capture Of Stanley Obroski
Part 5: 
Tarzan, Obroski and Burroughs
Part 6: 
The Center of the Circle
Part 7:
The City of God
Part 8:
More Stars Than 
There Are In Heaven
Part 9:
Conclusions and Prospectus
Part 10:
Tarzan's Excellent 
New York Adventure
W. S. Van Dyke's Horning Into Africa: A Photo Gallery


WEBJED: BILL HILLMAN
Visit our thousands of other sites at:
BILL AND SUE-ON HILLMAN ECLECTIC STUDIO
All ERB Images© and Tarzan® are Copyright ERB, Inc.- All Rights Reserved.
All Original Work ©1996-2010/2015 by Bill Hillman and/or Contributing Authors/Owners
No part of this web site may be reproduced without permission from the respective owners.